Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama (review)

The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama (review) 122Southern Cultures The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama. By E. Culpepper Clark. Oxford University Press, 1992. 305 pp. Cloth, $25.00. Reviewed by Tinsley E. Yarbrough, professor ofpolitical science at East Carolina University. His latest book is Judicial Enigma: The First Justice Harlan. In the wake of the Supreme Court's 1954-55 decisions striking down state-enforced segregation in the public schools, two young black women embarked upon a courageous mission to challenge racial barriers in Alabama, one of the most unreconstructed of southern states. In 1956 frantic University of Alabama officials found "moral" grounds for denying admission to Pollie Anne Myers, the determined and persistent natural leader of the two crusaders. The university complied with a federal judge's order to admit Myers's companion Autherine Lucy to its hallowed halls. Following campus rioting and Lucy's published suspicions that the university was involved in a conspiracy against her, school officials expelled her and the most outspoken white student opponent of her admission. Alabama's schools and colleges remained totally segregated until 1963, when George C. Wallace became the state's governor on a vow to "stand in the schoolhouse door," if necessary, to preserve "segregation now, tomorrow, and forever." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/the-schoolhouse-door-segregation-s-last-stand-at-the-university-of-OhJP1Kbmw5
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

122Southern Cultures The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama. By E. Culpepper Clark. Oxford University Press, 1992. 305 pp. Cloth, $25.00. Reviewed by Tinsley E. Yarbrough, professor ofpolitical science at East Carolina University. His latest book is Judicial Enigma: The First Justice Harlan. In the wake of the Supreme Court's 1954-55 decisions striking down state-enforced segregation in the public schools, two young black women embarked upon a courageous mission to challenge racial barriers in Alabama, one of the most unreconstructed of southern states. In 1956 frantic University of Alabama officials found "moral" grounds for denying admission to Pollie Anne Myers, the determined and persistent natural leader of the two crusaders. The university complied with a federal judge's order to admit Myers's companion Autherine Lucy to its hallowed halls. Following campus rioting and Lucy's published suspicions that the university was involved in a conspiracy against her, school officials expelled her and the most outspoken white student opponent of her admission. Alabama's schools and colleges remained totally segregated until 1963, when George C. Wallace became the state's governor on a vow to "stand in the schoolhouse door," if necessary, to preserve "segregation now, tomorrow, and forever."

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

There are no references for this article.