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The Sanctified South: John Lakin Brasher and the Holiness Movement (review)

The Sanctified South: John Lakin Brasher and the Holiness Movement (review) Reviews115 The black "better class"-- a generation slightly younger than Schenck, with more formal schooling and a loftier understanding of the nature of progress --was put off by his style and never quite felt at home in his arena. They shared, however, his belief in the possibility of working with whites, and early in the decade of the 1880s they eagerly embraced an intenacial coalition to support the great crusade for prohibition. It was a divisive issue in the black community. With whiskey off limits in the days of slavery, the right to drink had symbolic as well as recreational importance, and the masses of blacks followed saloonkeeper Schenck, rather than the ministers and teachers of the black better class. But if prohibition failed and then faded away, the alliances across racial lines did not. In this impressively researched and even-handed account, Greenwood documents a history of cooperation between blacks and whites that began with the end of the Civil War and continued until late in the 1890s. It was, of course, a flawed partnership. Whites were often fickle in their loyalty to blacks as the common ground shifted from one issue to the next. But the habit http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Sanctified South: John Lakin Brasher and the Holiness Movement (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews115 The black "better class"-- a generation slightly younger than Schenck, with more formal schooling and a loftier understanding of the nature of progress --was put off by his style and never quite felt at home in his arena. They shared, however, his belief in the possibility of working with whites, and early in the decade of the 1880s they eagerly embraced an intenacial coalition to support the great crusade for prohibition. It was a divisive issue in the black community. With whiskey off limits in the days of slavery, the right to drink had symbolic as well as recreational importance, and the masses of blacks followed saloonkeeper Schenck, rather than the ministers and teachers of the black better class. But if prohibition failed and then faded away, the alliances across racial lines did not. In this impressively researched and even-handed account, Greenwood documents a history of cooperation between blacks and whites that began with the end of the Civil War and continued until late in the 1890s. It was, of course, a flawed partnership. Whites were often fickle in their loyalty to blacks as the common ground shifted from one issue to the next. But the habit

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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