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The Sacramental Dada of T.S. Eliot

The Sacramental Dada of T.S. Eliot Sean Cotter The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 69-82 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0013 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414736/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST Sean Cotter Eliot's baptism and confirmation in the Anglican Church in 1927 is usu- ally taken to mark a conversion, not only in his spiritual life, but also in his aesthetics. This year divides the "early" from the "late" Eliot, the author of "Prufrock" and The Waste Land from the author of Ash- Wed- nesday and Four Quartets, the ironic avant-garde ventriloquist from the dogmatic czar of letters. Helen Gardner's statement is exemplary: The change in Mr Eliot's poetry cannot be discussed without reference to the fact that the author ofAsh Wednesday is a Christian while the author of The Waste Land was not. Nobody can underrate the momentousness for any mature person of acceptance of all that membership of the Christian Church entails. (103) While it is not clear what all is entailed, we can hear in "momentous- ness" the solemn tone reserved for this moment in Eliot's life, as though he has made a desperate and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Sacramental Dada of T.S. Eliot

The Comparatist , Volume 26 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Sean Cotter The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 69-82 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0013 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414736/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST Sean Cotter Eliot's baptism and confirmation in the Anglican Church in 1927 is usu- ally taken to mark a conversion, not only in his spiritual life, but also in his aesthetics. This year divides the "early" from the "late" Eliot, the author of "Prufrock" and The Waste Land from the author of Ash- Wed- nesday and Four Quartets, the ironic avant-garde ventriloquist from the dogmatic czar of letters. Helen Gardner's statement is exemplary: The change in Mr Eliot's poetry cannot be discussed without reference to the fact that the author ofAsh Wednesday is a Christian while the author of The Waste Land was not. Nobody can underrate the momentousness for any mature person of acceptance of all that membership of the Christian Church entails. (103) While it is not clear what all is entailed, we can hear in "momentous- ness" the solemn tone reserved for this moment in Eliot's life, as though he has made a desperate and

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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