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The Romance of Reunion: Northerners and the South, 1865-1900 (review)

The Romance of Reunion: Northerners and the South, 1865-1900 (review) 112Southern Cultures absorbed any political philosophy from his father or even had anything beyond the most tenuous contact with him. During Reconstruction Kenneth Rayner modified his views on education for African Americans and probably did something to help John obtain a few years of schooling at St. Augustine's Normal and Collegiate Institute. From that point forward, however, the two men never saw each other and certainly had no political discussions. Although Cantrell sees interesting parallels "between Whiggery, Know-Nothingism, and Populism," there is no evidence that John B. Rayner shared his father's political values or was consciously following in his father's footsteps. Superficially, the pattern of John's life minored Kenneth's. After a few years in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, where he taught school, engaged in local politics, and sold liquor, John Rayner moved to Texas in about 1880. In 1887 he became a strategist for the prohibitionist forces and helped them court the black vote. At this time he said that his opposition to liquor sprang from "deep religious principle." In the 1890s he became a major figure in the state's Populist party, speaking often and effectively to black farmers and sagely advising white Populists on what mattered most http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Romance of Reunion: Northerners and the South, 1865-1900 (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
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Abstract

112Southern Cultures absorbed any political philosophy from his father or even had anything beyond the most tenuous contact with him. During Reconstruction Kenneth Rayner modified his views on education for African Americans and probably did something to help John obtain a few years of schooling at St. Augustine's Normal and Collegiate Institute. From that point forward, however, the two men never saw each other and certainly had no political discussions. Although Cantrell sees interesting parallels "between Whiggery, Know-Nothingism, and Populism," there is no evidence that John B. Rayner shared his father's political values or was consciously following in his father's footsteps. Superficially, the pattern of John's life minored Kenneth's. After a few years in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, where he taught school, engaged in local politics, and sold liquor, John Rayner moved to Texas in about 1880. In 1887 he became a strategist for the prohibitionist forces and helped them court the black vote. At this time he said that his opposition to liquor sprang from "deep religious principle." In the 1890s he became a major figure in the state's Populist party, speaking often and effectively to black farmers and sagely advising white Populists on what mattered most

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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