Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Promises of Liberty: The History and Contemporary Relevance of the Thirteenth Amendment (review)

The Promises of Liberty: The History and Contemporary Relevance of the Thirteenth Amendment (review) national Equal Rights League; Pennsylvania’s chapter of the league suc- cessfully lobbied for an 1867 state law integrating streetcars and for ratifi - cation of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1869. Philadelphia’s fi rst two interracial elections highlight the continued need to look more closely at Reconstruction in the North. Although the 1870 election came off with no violence owing to the presence of fed- eral troops, the riot that occurred in 1871 might just have well occurred in postwar Memphis or New Orleans. With the Republican Party squea- mish about calling in federal troops and facing mounting threats of vio- lence, city offi cials called the black soldiers of the Fifth Brigade into the contested wards to quiet the disorder. Catto was shot before he could arm himself, by a gunman who was familiar with his activism and who identi- fi ed him closely with the ascendant Republican Party. In some sense, his death was not in vain, as the Republicans swept to victory in the elections, and Philadelphians briefl y closed ranks and mourned the young man as another of the Civil War’s victims. But a few years passed before there was a trial, and though everyone seemed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Promises of Liberty: The History and Contemporary Relevance of the Thirteenth Amendment (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (3) – Aug 29, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/the-promises-of-liberty-the-history-and-contemporary-relevance-of-the-80sTdA0PSp
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

national Equal Rights League; Pennsylvania’s chapter of the league suc- cessfully lobbied for an 1867 state law integrating streetcars and for ratifi - cation of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1869. Philadelphia’s fi rst two interracial elections highlight the continued need to look more closely at Reconstruction in the North. Although the 1870 election came off with no violence owing to the presence of fed- eral troops, the riot that occurred in 1871 might just have well occurred in postwar Memphis or New Orleans. With the Republican Party squea- mish about calling in federal troops and facing mounting threats of vio- lence, city offi cials called the black soldiers of the Fifth Brigade into the contested wards to quiet the disorder. Catto was shot before he could arm himself, by a gunman who was familiar with his activism and who identi- fi ed him closely with the ascendant Republican Party. In some sense, his death was not in vain, as the Republicans swept to victory in the elections, and Philadelphians briefl y closed ranks and mourned the young man as another of the Civil War’s victims. But a few years passed before there was a trial, and though everyone seemed

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2012

There are no references for this article.