“The Progress of the Heat Within”: The West Indies, Yellow Fever, and Citizenship in William Wells Brown’s Clotel

“The Progress of the Heat Within”: The West Indies, Yellow Fever, and Citizenship in William... " heProgressoftheHeatWithin": T TheWestIndies,YellowFever, andCitizenshipinWilliamWells Brown'sClotel by Kelly Wisecup During certain seasons of the year, all tropical climates are subject to epidemics of a most destructive nature. The inhabitants of New Orleans look with as much certainty for the appearance of the yellow-fever, smallpox, or cholera, in the hot-season, as the Londoner does for fog in the month of November. --William Wells Brown, Clotel With the above statement in his 1853 novel Clotel, William Wells Brown begins his description of the New Orleans yellow fever epidemic that fractures the Morton family and sends another generation of Thomas Jefferson's descendents to the auction block. The statement is followed by a brief description of the yellow fever epidemic and its effects upon the human and social body before Brown picks up his narrative about Clotel, her family, and the social effects of racial amalgamation. This passage, Brown's geopolitical positioning of the epidemic, and his literary-historical sources for its representation, are worth a second look. In a passage unique to the 1853 novel, Brown compares New Orleans' epidemics to London's fogs, suggesting that epidemics in the U.S. South are similar to the rainy environment which defines London, and, by extension, Londoners. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

“The Progress of the Heat Within”: The West Indies, Yellow Fever, and Citizenship in William Wells Brown’s Clotel

The Southern Literary Journal, Volume 41 (1) – Feb 12, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/the-progress-of-the-heat-within-the-west-indies-yellow-fever-and-khadmjEdzQ
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Department of English and Comparative Literature of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

" heProgressoftheHeatWithin": T TheWestIndies,YellowFever, andCitizenshipinWilliamWells Brown'sClotel by Kelly Wisecup During certain seasons of the year, all tropical climates are subject to epidemics of a most destructive nature. The inhabitants of New Orleans look with as much certainty for the appearance of the yellow-fever, smallpox, or cholera, in the hot-season, as the Londoner does for fog in the month of November. --William Wells Brown, Clotel With the above statement in his 1853 novel Clotel, William Wells Brown begins his description of the New Orleans yellow fever epidemic that fractures the Morton family and sends another generation of Thomas Jefferson's descendents to the auction block. The statement is followed by a brief description of the yellow fever epidemic and its effects upon the human and social body before Brown picks up his narrative about Clotel, her family, and the social effects of racial amalgamation. This passage, Brown's geopolitical positioning of the epidemic, and his literary-historical sources for its representation, are worth a second look. In a passage unique to the 1853 novel, Brown compares New Orleans' epidemics to London's fogs, suggesting that epidemics in the U.S. South are similar to the rainy environment which defines London, and, by extension, Londoners.

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 12, 2009

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off