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The North American Crisis of the 1860s

The North American Crisis of the 1860s patric k j. kelly We have no craftier enemy than Louis Napoleon. His operations in Mexico were meant as a powerful fl ank movement for the rebellion. They were leveled at the United States, and the United States are not likely to forget it. —Harper’s Weekly, December 9, 1865 From our point of view, his [Maximilian’s] victory would have been a calamity— not that it would have made the condition of Mexico worse than it is—but because it would have struck a disastrous blow at the cause of Republicanism on this Continent. —New York Times, July 2, 1867 On June 19, 1867, a squad of Mexican soldiers under the command of Gen. Mariano Escobedo executed Maximilian of Austria on a hillside outside the city of Querétaro, Mexico. Just days before this dramatic event, an edito- rial in the Chicago Tribune argued, “Whoever shall write the history of the Great Rebellion will not complete it until he has traced to its fi nal termina- tion the eff ort of the Austrian Archduke to establish himself on the throne of a Mexican empire.” This infl uential newspaper’s prediction was based on its belief that when the Imperial troops of the Austrian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The North American Crisis of the 1860s

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (3) – Aug 29, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

patric k j. kelly We have no craftier enemy than Louis Napoleon. His operations in Mexico were meant as a powerful fl ank movement for the rebellion. They were leveled at the United States, and the United States are not likely to forget it. —Harper’s Weekly, December 9, 1865 From our point of view, his [Maximilian’s] victory would have been a calamity— not that it would have made the condition of Mexico worse than it is—but because it would have struck a disastrous blow at the cause of Republicanism on this Continent. —New York Times, July 2, 1867 On June 19, 1867, a squad of Mexican soldiers under the command of Gen. Mariano Escobedo executed Maximilian of Austria on a hillside outside the city of Querétaro, Mexico. Just days before this dramatic event, an edito- rial in the Chicago Tribune argued, “Whoever shall write the history of the Great Rebellion will not complete it until he has traced to its fi nal termina- tion the eff ort of the Austrian Archduke to establish himself on the throne of a Mexican empire.” This infl uential newspaper’s prediction was based on its belief that when the Imperial troops of the Austrian

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2012

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