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The New York Times: Disunion: Modern Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from Lincoln’s Election to the Emancipation Proclamation ed. by Ted Widmer (review)

The New York Times: Disunion: Modern Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from... cogent explanation. Further, it considers questions about war and society that retain their relevance today. All military commanders should be interested in how to retain power in defeat. Varon offers good evidence that Lee's postwar campaign on behalf of a beleaguered but noble white South should be ranked among his most important. Equally important is the question of how much retribution a victor should demand. In contrast to our modern fear of enacting another Versailles, Varon's reading of Appomattox reveals the perils of generosity and indecision. These issues should command the attention of soldiers and civilians alike, as should this excellent volume. Aaron Sheehan-Dean aaron sheehan-dean, Fred C. Frey Professor at Louisiana State University, is the author of Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). The New York Times: Disunion: Modern Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from Lincoln's Election to the Emancipation Proclamation. Edited by Ted Widmer. With Clay Risen and George Kalogerakis. (New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2013. Pp. 464. Cloth, $27.95.) In late 1862, Lincoln has promised to free the South's slaves on New Year's Day, as a war tactic; "We had about played http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The New York Times: Disunion: Modern Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from Lincoln’s Election to the Emancipation Proclamation ed. by Ted Widmer (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 4 (3) – Aug 9, 2014

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

cogent explanation. Further, it considers questions about war and society that retain their relevance today. All military commanders should be interested in how to retain power in defeat. Varon offers good evidence that Lee's postwar campaign on behalf of a beleaguered but noble white South should be ranked among his most important. Equally important is the question of how much retribution a victor should demand. In contrast to our modern fear of enacting another Versailles, Varon's reading of Appomattox reveals the perils of generosity and indecision. These issues should command the attention of soldiers and civilians alike, as should this excellent volume. Aaron Sheehan-Dean aaron sheehan-dean, Fred C. Frey Professor at Louisiana State University, is the author of Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). The New York Times: Disunion: Modern Historians Revisit and Reconsider the Civil War from Lincoln's Election to the Emancipation Proclamation. Edited by Ted Widmer. With Clay Risen and George Kalogerakis. (New York: Black Dog & Leventhal, 2013. Pp. 464. Cloth, $27.95.) In late 1862, Lincoln has promised to free the South's slaves on New Year's Day, as a war tactic; "We had about played

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 9, 2014

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