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The Men of Mobtown: Policing Baltimore in the Age of Slavery and Emancipation by Adam Malka (review)

The Men of Mobtown: Policing Baltimore in the Age of Slavery and Emancipation by Adam Malka (review) 2. Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton: or, Men and Events, at Home and Abroad, during Three Quarters of a Century (New York: C. Scribner, 1869), 480. 3. With Lincoln in the White House: Letters, Memoranda, and Other Writings of John G. Nicolay, 1860–1865, edited by Michael Burlingame (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000), 41. matthew pinsker holds the Brian Pohanka Chair in American Civil War History at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The Men of Mobtown: Policing Baltimore in the Age of Slavery and Emancipation. By Adam Malka. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018. Pp. 352. Cloth, $39.95.) ”The whole sentiment of Baltimore was murderous,” recalls Frederick Douglass in his autobiography My Bondage and My Freedom. He had been brutally attacked by four white workmen at Gardiner’s shipyard and barely escaped with his life. Douglass laments that “Lynch law” prevailed in Baltimore, “nor was there much of any other law toward colored people, at that time, in any other part of Maryland.” Adam Malka’s The Men of Mobtown takes issue with Douglass’s claim of lawlessness. Rather, he argues, white male power was legally authorized, so what appeared to be the absence of law when it came to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Men of Mobtown: Policing Baltimore in the Age of Slavery and Emancipation by Adam Malka (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (1) – Mar 2, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

2. Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton: or, Men and Events, at Home and Abroad, during Three Quarters of a Century (New York: C. Scribner, 1869), 480. 3. With Lincoln in the White House: Letters, Memoranda, and Other Writings of John G. Nicolay, 1860–1865, edited by Michael Burlingame (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000), 41. matthew pinsker holds the Brian Pohanka Chair in American Civil War History at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The Men of Mobtown: Policing Baltimore in the Age of Slavery and Emancipation. By Adam Malka. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018. Pp. 352. Cloth, $39.95.) ”The whole sentiment of Baltimore was murderous,” recalls Frederick Douglass in his autobiography My Bondage and My Freedom. He had been brutally attacked by four white workmen at Gardiner’s shipyard and barely escaped with his life. Douglass laments that “Lynch law” prevailed in Baltimore, “nor was there much of any other law toward colored people, at that time, in any other part of Maryland.” Adam Malka’s The Men of Mobtown takes issue with Douglass’s claim of lawlessness. Rather, he argues, white male power was legally authorized, so what appeared to be the absence of law when it came to

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 2, 2020

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