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The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture (review)

The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture (review) books The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture Edited by Alice Fahs and Joan Waugh University of North Carolina Press, 2004 286 pp. Cloth $59.95; paper $19.95 Reviewed by W. Fitzhugh Brundage, who teaches at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is the author of The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory, published this fall by Harvard University Press. Soon after the Civil War--and long before the current interest in "historical memory"--Americans understood that the way they remembered the Civil War would define their nation. For nearly a century and a half, commemoration of the Civil War has served as a sort of national Rorschach test, exposing divisions of region, race, and gender that no amount of nationalist rhetoric could camouflage. The "memory" of the war has attracted the attention of gifted commentators ranging from Edmund Wilson to Robert Penn Warren. More recently, Gaines Foster and David Blight have contributed essential works that clarify the shifting interpretations of the war during the half-century after Appomattox. Now The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture, a collection of essays edited by Alice Fahs and Joan Waugh, offers a summation of current http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

books The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture Edited by Alice Fahs and Joan Waugh University of North Carolina Press, 2004 286 pp. Cloth $59.95; paper $19.95 Reviewed by W. Fitzhugh Brundage, who teaches at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is the author of The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory, published this fall by Harvard University Press. Soon after the Civil War--and long before the current interest in "historical memory"--Americans understood that the way they remembered the Civil War would define their nation. For nearly a century and a half, commemoration of the Civil War has served as a sort of national Rorschach test, exposing divisions of region, race, and gender that no amount of nationalist rhetoric could camouflage. The "memory" of the war has attracted the attention of gifted commentators ranging from Edmund Wilson to Robert Penn Warren. More recently, Gaines Foster and David Blight have contributed essential works that clarify the shifting interpretations of the war during the half-century after Appomattox. Now The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture, a collection of essays edited by Alice Fahs and Joan Waugh, offers a summation of current

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2005

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