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The Medieval Beast in a Modern Musical Setting

The Medieval Beast in a Modern Musical Setting Judith Barban The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 53-68 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0008 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414735/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST THE MEDIEVAL BEAST IN A MODERN MUSICAL SETTING Judith Barban The currents of influence and inspiration among the creative domains of music, literature, and art have been a focus of debate not only among art, literary, and music critics, but to an even greater degree among the artists themselves. These aesthetic arguments were especially promin- ent in the nineteenth century: Hugo's prefaces to his dramas, Baude- laire's Salons, Zola's articles on Edouard Manet, Wagner's Oper und Drama, and Kandinsky's theory of Monumentalkunst serve as well- known examples. In the late twentieth century, theorists specializing in the interrelations of the arts provided a more comprehensive view and a more precise language for the analysis of ekphrastic works: Claus Clüver, Calvin Brown, Jean-Pierre Barricelli, Thomas Jensen Hines, and Siglind Bruhn, among others, have done much to concretize the field of interart comparatist studies. Art has inspired poetry (for example, Jorge de Sena's "Fragonard's Swing," Baudelaire's "Les Phares" and his sonnet http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Medieval Beast in a Modern Musical Setting

The Comparatist , Volume 26 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Judith Barban The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 53-68 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0008 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414735/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST THE MEDIEVAL BEAST IN A MODERN MUSICAL SETTING Judith Barban The currents of influence and inspiration among the creative domains of music, literature, and art have been a focus of debate not only among art, literary, and music critics, but to an even greater degree among the artists themselves. These aesthetic arguments were especially promin- ent in the nineteenth century: Hugo's prefaces to his dramas, Baude- laire's Salons, Zola's articles on Edouard Manet, Wagner's Oper und Drama, and Kandinsky's theory of Monumentalkunst serve as well- known examples. In the late twentieth century, theorists specializing in the interrelations of the arts provided a more comprehensive view and a more precise language for the analysis of ekphrastic works: Claus Clüver, Calvin Brown, Jean-Pierre Barricelli, Thomas Jensen Hines, and Siglind Bruhn, among others, have done much to concretize the field of interart comparatist studies. Art has inspired poetry (for example, Jorge de Sena's "Fragonard's Swing," Baudelaire's "Les Phares" and his sonnet

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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