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The Lynching of Emmett Till: A Documentary Narrative (review)

The Lynching of Emmett Till: A Documentary Narrative (review) books The Lynching of Emmett Till A Documentary Narrative Edited by Christopher Metress University of Virginia Press, 2002 360 pp. Cloth $59.50, paper $18.95 Reviewed by Stephen J. Whitfield, professor of American studies at Brandeis University and author of A Death in the Delta: The Story of Emmett Till. Born near Chicago in 1941, Emmett Till was murdered in the Mississippi Delta on August 28, 1955, and became the best-known victim of racial violence in American history. Visiting relatives shortly before he would have become an eighth grader, Till entered a store in Leflore County and as a prank behaved suggestively toward Carolyn Bryant, the 21-year-old wife of the absent owner. Because of the breach of racial etiquette, Carolyn's husband Roy Bryant and his halfbrother, J. W. Milam, abducted Till from the home of his great-uncle, Moses Wright, pistol-whipped "the Chicago boy," murdered him, and then dumped the corpse into the Tallahatchie River. Bryant and Milam were prosecuted about a month later; but, despite forthright testimony by the victim's mother, Mamie Till Bradley, a jury of twelve white men acquitted them in late September, 1955. Protected by the Bill of Rights, which prohibits double jeopardy, the half-brothers soon http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Lynching of Emmett Till: A Documentary Narrative (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 9 (4) – Nov 13, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

books The Lynching of Emmett Till A Documentary Narrative Edited by Christopher Metress University of Virginia Press, 2002 360 pp. Cloth $59.50, paper $18.95 Reviewed by Stephen J. Whitfield, professor of American studies at Brandeis University and author of A Death in the Delta: The Story of Emmett Till. Born near Chicago in 1941, Emmett Till was murdered in the Mississippi Delta on August 28, 1955, and became the best-known victim of racial violence in American history. Visiting relatives shortly before he would have become an eighth grader, Till entered a store in Leflore County and as a prank behaved suggestively toward Carolyn Bryant, the 21-year-old wife of the absent owner. Because of the breach of racial etiquette, Carolyn's husband Roy Bryant and his halfbrother, J. W. Milam, abducted Till from the home of his great-uncle, Moses Wright, pistol-whipped "the Chicago boy," murdered him, and then dumped the corpse into the Tallahatchie River. Bryant and Milam were prosecuted about a month later; but, despite forthright testimony by the victim's mother, Mamie Till Bradley, a jury of twelve white men acquitted them in late September, 1955. Protected by the Bill of Rights, which prohibits double jeopardy, the half-brothers soon

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 13, 2003

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