Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Loyal West: Civil War and Reunion in Middle America by Matthew E. Stanley (review)

The Loyal West: Civil War and Reunion in Middle America by Matthew E. Stanley (review) students had minimal time in the classroom. However, Hyde uses an essay by Joseph Lightsey, a yeoman Mississippi farmer, to show how his smat- tering of formal education still permitted “a cultivated mind, both learned and creative” (149). While the cities provided the most diverse offerings, from basic to advanced instruction, Hyde shows that learning did occur in the rural areas. Like their urban counterparts, rural southerners took immense pride in the annual examinations and student expositions. Whether educated locally or at a distance from home, students remem- bered their school experiences fondly. In light of how thoroughly Hyde documents the abundance of learning in the Gulf South states before the Civil War, her lack of discussion of the Creoles of color is noteworthy. Mobile officials’ expansion of education to this population reflects the profound value placed on individuals deemed to be free citizens before the Civil War. Moreover, the expansion prompted criticism from white New Orleans newspapers. An examination of the Creoles of color would have added even more credence to Hyde’s discus- sion of the exceptional nature of Alabama’s public school system over those of Louisiana and Mississippi. Nonetheless, Hyde’s survey of antebellum education is an important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Loyal West: Civil War and Reunion in Middle America by Matthew E. Stanley (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 6, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/the-loyal-west-civil-war-and-reunion-in-middle-america-by-matthew-e-06Vi7UEfln
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

students had minimal time in the classroom. However, Hyde uses an essay by Joseph Lightsey, a yeoman Mississippi farmer, to show how his smat- tering of formal education still permitted “a cultivated mind, both learned and creative” (149). While the cities provided the most diverse offerings, from basic to advanced instruction, Hyde shows that learning did occur in the rural areas. Like their urban counterparts, rural southerners took immense pride in the annual examinations and student expositions. Whether educated locally or at a distance from home, students remem- bered their school experiences fondly. In light of how thoroughly Hyde documents the abundance of learning in the Gulf South states before the Civil War, her lack of discussion of the Creoles of color is noteworthy. Mobile officials’ expansion of education to this population reflects the profound value placed on individuals deemed to be free citizens before the Civil War. Moreover, the expansion prompted criticism from white New Orleans newspapers. An examination of the Creoles of color would have added even more credence to Hyde’s discus- sion of the exceptional nature of Alabama’s public school system over those of Louisiana and Mississippi. Nonetheless, Hyde’s survey of antebellum education is an important

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2018

There are no references for this article.