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The Life of a Southerner (in Drawings): An Interview with Jesse Whitaker

The Life of a Southerner (in Drawings): An Interview with Jesse Whitaker Not Forgotten The Life of a Southerner (in Drawings): An Interview with Jesse Whitaker Gretchen Givens At the age of 51, Jesse Whitaker began drawing pencil sketches of his memories of being a schoolboy in eastern North Carolina. The collection of his sketches that follows and his accompanying thoughts about the events taking place during that time are vehicles through which southerners can understand his life and his sense of place within the his- tory of the South. Whitaker understands the politics of growing up black in eastern North Carolina, and subtly expresses social norms in his depictions of Jim Crow North Carolina. Jesse Whitaker Whitaker was born to a sharecropping family in Lawrence (Edgecombe County, North Carolina) in 1937. He attended segregated public schools when he did not have to work the fields with his family. He left Edgecombe County in 1955 to join the navy but returned after realizing that he needed a high school diploma to become an officer. He finished high school in 1960, enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College, and left the college three years later after realizing that he could not pass the mathematics entrance exam that would allow him http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Life of a Southerner (in Drawings): An Interview with Jesse Whitaker

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Not Forgotten The Life of a Southerner (in Drawings): An Interview with Jesse Whitaker Gretchen Givens At the age of 51, Jesse Whitaker began drawing pencil sketches of his memories of being a schoolboy in eastern North Carolina. The collection of his sketches that follows and his accompanying thoughts about the events taking place during that time are vehicles through which southerners can understand his life and his sense of place within the his- tory of the South. Whitaker understands the politics of growing up black in eastern North Carolina, and subtly expresses social norms in his depictions of Jim Crow North Carolina. Jesse Whitaker Whitaker was born to a sharecropping family in Lawrence (Edgecombe County, North Carolina) in 1937. He attended segregated public schools when he did not have to work the fields with his family. He left Edgecombe County in 1955 to join the navy but returned after realizing that he needed a high school diploma to become an officer. He finished high school in 1960, enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College, and left the college three years later after realizing that he could not pass the mathematics entrance exam that would allow him

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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