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The Life, Deer Hunting in Rain, Ties, Chalk, and Threads, End of Another Day

The Life, Deer Hunting in Rain, Ties, Chalk, and Threads, End of Another Day Mason–­Dixon Lines The Life, Deer Hunting in Rain, Ties, Chalk, and Threads, End of Another Day p o e t ry b y M i c h a e l C h i t wo o d s e l e c t e d a n d i n t ro d u c e d b y M i c h a e l M c F e e Michael Chitwood, by Catherine A. Moore. “What you notice becomes your life,” writes Michael Chitwood, in the last line of the last poem in his magnificent book The Weave Room (1998). What he has noticed, so sharply and for so long—in eight collections of poetry, in two books of essays, and as the first and only poetry editor of Southern Cultures, for the past sixteen years—is, in fact, life, everyday life, the details of the life we everyday humans live and share, particularly in this region of the country and in the Virginia mountains of his upbringing. In all of Chitwood’s work, he pays attention to things too often or too easily overlooked, holding them up as worthy of noticing and appreciating: the threads clinging to mill http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Life, Deer Hunting in Rain, Ties, Chalk, and Threads, End of Another Day

Southern Cultures , Volume 23 (2) – Jul 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Mason–­Dixon Lines The Life, Deer Hunting in Rain, Ties, Chalk, and Threads, End of Another Day p o e t ry b y M i c h a e l C h i t wo o d s e l e c t e d a n d i n t ro d u c e d b y M i c h a e l M c F e e Michael Chitwood, by Catherine A. Moore. “What you notice becomes your life,” writes Michael Chitwood, in the last line of the last poem in his magnificent book The Weave Room (1998). What he has noticed, so sharply and for so long—in eight collections of poetry, in two books of essays, and as the first and only poetry editor of Southern Cultures, for the past sixteen years—is, in fact, life, everyday life, the details of the life we everyday humans live and share, particularly in this region of the country and in the Virginia mountains of his upbringing. In all of Chitwood’s work, he pays attention to things too often or too easily overlooked, holding them up as worthy of noticing and appreciating: the threads clinging to mill

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 20, 2017

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