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The Life and Legends of Calamity Jane by Richard W. Etulain (review)

The Life and Legends of Calamity Jane by Richard W. Etulain (review) cooperation, and even the hiring of non-Indian professionals as advocates, ultimately enabled some Modocs to receive the pensions to which their military service entitled them. Drawing on ten oral history interviews to provide a sense of the Indigenous perspective, the final chapter and an epilogue discuss historical tourism in the Klamath Basin, using the Golden Bear Monument and Canby’s Cross at the Lava Beds as specific examples of American innocence being perpetuated through memorialization. While the author’s use of sources and theoretical interpretations are mostly sound, some readers might find the tone and language—which echo those of certain Indigenist scholars—to be at times provocative and antagonistic. This is especially true in the introduction, where Cothran proclaims modern-day Americans to be indifferent tourists subsumed in a mythological mind-set of blissful innocence, going so far as to refer to the September 11 terrorist attacks as “allegedly unprovoked assaults on supposedly innocent American citizens” (20, italics mine). Much like any noncombatant Indians who lost their lives in the Modoc War, the nearly three thousand civilians killed in those 2001 attacks (including close to four hundred non-U.S. citizens) fell victim to the violent outcome of a conflict in which they themselves played no http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Life and Legends of Calamity Jane by Richard W. Etulain (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 5 (4) – Nov 21, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

cooperation, and even the hiring of non-Indian professionals as advocates, ultimately enabled some Modocs to receive the pensions to which their military service entitled them. Drawing on ten oral history interviews to provide a sense of the Indigenous perspective, the final chapter and an epilogue discuss historical tourism in the Klamath Basin, using the Golden Bear Monument and Canby’s Cross at the Lava Beds as specific examples of American innocence being perpetuated through memorialization. While the author’s use of sources and theoretical interpretations are mostly sound, some readers might find the tone and language—which echo those of certain Indigenist scholars—to be at times provocative and antagonistic. This is especially true in the introduction, where Cothran proclaims modern-day Americans to be indifferent tourists subsumed in a mythological mind-set of blissful innocence, going so far as to refer to the September 11 terrorist attacks as “allegedly unprovoked assaults on supposedly innocent American citizens” (20, italics mine). Much like any noncombatant Indians who lost their lives in the Modoc War, the nearly three thousand civilians killed in those 2001 attacks (including close to four hundred non-U.S. citizens) fell victim to the violent outcome of a conflict in which they themselves played no

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 21, 2015

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