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The Letters of a Victorian Madwoman (review)

The Letters of a Victorian Madwoman (review) Reviews253 other prominent blacks and a white Northerner after having made what local white men considered an "incendiary speech about the white people putting them in slavery." And the list goes on. Freedom's Lawmakers is an extraordinarily valuable reference source, not only as a place to find the details of a particular black officeholder's life, but also as a collective portrait of a regional black leadership, the first in the South's history. It is on the latter score, however, that Foner falters somewhat. The generalizations he draws are for the most part strictly descriptive. What the dynamics of that emerging regional leadership might have been is left to the reader to infer. Foner, for example, draws attention to the diversity of experience among black officeholders but does not comment on what that diversity meant to black communities throughout the South. On the one hand, the region might have produced a variety of leaders who brought several constituencies into one big tent, and therein lies an explanation for the extraordinary success of southern black people in putting together an effective regional leadership less than one generation after slavery. On the other hand, a variety of leaders may have resulted http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Letters of a Victorian Madwoman (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 1 (2) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews253 other prominent blacks and a white Northerner after having made what local white men considered an "incendiary speech about the white people putting them in slavery." And the list goes on. Freedom's Lawmakers is an extraordinarily valuable reference source, not only as a place to find the details of a particular black officeholder's life, but also as a collective portrait of a regional black leadership, the first in the South's history. It is on the latter score, however, that Foner falters somewhat. The generalizations he draws are for the most part strictly descriptive. What the dynamics of that emerging regional leadership might have been is left to the reader to infer. Foner, for example, draws attention to the diversity of experience among black officeholders but does not comment on what that diversity meant to black communities throughout the South. On the one hand, the region might have produced a variety of leaders who brought several constituencies into one big tent, and therein lies an explanation for the extraordinary success of southern black people in putting together an effective regional leadership less than one generation after slavery. On the other hand, a variety of leaders may have resulted

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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