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The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt by Patrick H. Breen (review)

The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt by Patrick H. Breen... case--that political operatives were carefully working to shape opinion. To John C. Calhoun there should have been a constitutional bulwark against the vagaries of widely divergent opinion, in the form of the "concurrent" veto power of the slave interest in public affairs. Post­Civil War "liberals" would work on their own barriers to a corrupt majoritarian public opinion, aiming to protect the "best men" from democracy in government through civil service reforms. In closing, I would offer a gentle critique, and some epistemological context for this excellent book. Schmeller might have dabbled a bit further in the private correspondence of political actors at all levels. These manuscripts are filled with a hard-nosed metadiscussion of how to "shape the public mind," or simply mobilize the voters. Partisans asked each other to contribute essays to specific papers for specific purposes; they counted turnout and assessed electoral climates as well as any contemporary consultant or pollster. Then there is the issue of intellectual priorities. Throughout I was reminded of the distinction between "emic" and "etic," between the priorities of the subject and those of the observer. Schmeller gives, as perhaps he should, an "emic" account of how public opinion was imagined by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt by Patrick H. Breen (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (1) – Jan 26, 2017

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

case--that political operatives were carefully working to shape opinion. To John C. Calhoun there should have been a constitutional bulwark against the vagaries of widely divergent opinion, in the form of the "concurrent" veto power of the slave interest in public affairs. Post­Civil War "liberals" would work on their own barriers to a corrupt majoritarian public opinion, aiming to protect the "best men" from democracy in government through civil service reforms. In closing, I would offer a gentle critique, and some epistemological context for this excellent book. Schmeller might have dabbled a bit further in the private correspondence of political actors at all levels. These manuscripts are filled with a hard-nosed metadiscussion of how to "shape the public mind," or simply mobilize the voters. Partisans asked each other to contribute essays to specific papers for specific purposes; they counted turnout and assessed electoral climates as well as any contemporary consultant or pollster. Then there is the issue of intellectual priorities. Throughout I was reminded of the distinction between "emic" and "etic," between the priorities of the subject and those of the observer. Schmeller gives, as perhaps he should, an "emic" account of how public opinion was imagined by

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 26, 2017

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