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The Importance of Cultural Ecological Landscapes to the Survival of the Bachman’s Warbler ( Vermivora bachmanii ) in the Southeastern United States

The Importance of Cultural Ecological Landscapes to the Survival of the Bachman’s Warbler (... Abstract: This paper speculates about the relationship between the Vermivora bachmanii Audubon (Bachman’s Warbler) and canebrakes, an ecosystem partly created and maintained by human disturbance. This paper argues that because the Bachman’s Warbler was a canebrake specialist, the decline of human disturbance, which maintained this ecosystem, ultimately set in motion the decline and possible extinction of the Warbler. Thus, the Bachman’s Warbler was a cultural ecological-dependent species. It may at first seem strange to describe a bird species as dependent on cultural ecological practices (mainly burning for agriculture in this case), but the Bachman’s Warbler was indeed dependent on the ecosystem—canebrakes—that Native American land use practices produced and maintained. As the cultural ecological practices or agency that helped create and maintain canebrakes declined, so too did the Bachman’s Warbler. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeastern Geographer University of North Carolina Press

The Importance of Cultural Ecological Landscapes to the Survival of the Bachman’s Warbler ( Vermivora bachmanii ) in the Southeastern United States

Southeastern Geographer , Volume 50 (2) – Jul 11, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1549-6929
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This paper speculates about the relationship between the Vermivora bachmanii Audubon (Bachman’s Warbler) and canebrakes, an ecosystem partly created and maintained by human disturbance. This paper argues that because the Bachman’s Warbler was a canebrake specialist, the decline of human disturbance, which maintained this ecosystem, ultimately set in motion the decline and possible extinction of the Warbler. Thus, the Bachman’s Warbler was a cultural ecological-dependent species. It may at first seem strange to describe a bird species as dependent on cultural ecological practices (mainly burning for agriculture in this case), but the Bachman’s Warbler was indeed dependent on the ecosystem—canebrakes—that Native American land use practices produced and maintained. As the cultural ecological practices or agency that helped create and maintain canebrakes declined, so too did the Bachman’s Warbler.

Journal

Southeastern GeographerUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 11, 2010

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