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The Grand Ole Opry and the Urban South

The Grand Ole Opry and the Urban South essay ...................... by Louis M. Kyriakoudes The Grand Ole Opry continued to thrive after World War II, thanks in part to national stars such as Roy Acuff. Courtesy of the Southern Folklife Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ne Saturday evening in 1927, George D. Hay, the program director of Nashville radio station wsm, was preparing to introduce the evening's local program, the wsm Barn Dance. Not really a barn dance at all, the program's succession of what was then called "old time" or "hillbilly" musical acts interspersed with comedy routines made it more akin to vaudeville or minstrelsy. Hay had begun the program soon after arriving at the then one-month-old station in November 1925, and the heady brew of traditional string-band music performed by musicians drawn from Nashville and its hinterland proved extremely popular with radio audiences across the South. On that night, the Barn Dance followed an nbc network presentation of symphonic music from New York. The conductor, Walter Damrosch, stating over the airways that he was making an exception to his rule that "there was no place in the classics for realism," ended his program with a performance of a brief orchestral composition http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Grand Ole Opry and the Urban South

Southern Cultures , Volume 10 (1) – May 3, 2004

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

essay ...................... by Louis M. Kyriakoudes The Grand Ole Opry continued to thrive after World War II, thanks in part to national stars such as Roy Acuff. Courtesy of the Southern Folklife Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ne Saturday evening in 1927, George D. Hay, the program director of Nashville radio station wsm, was preparing to introduce the evening's local program, the wsm Barn Dance. Not really a barn dance at all, the program's succession of what was then called "old time" or "hillbilly" musical acts interspersed with comedy routines made it more akin to vaudeville or minstrelsy. Hay had begun the program soon after arriving at the then one-month-old station in November 1925, and the heady brew of traditional string-band music performed by musicians drawn from Nashville and its hinterland proved extremely popular with radio audiences across the South. On that night, the Barn Dance followed an nbc network presentation of symphonic music from New York. The conductor, Walter Damrosch, stating over the airways that he was making an exception to his rule that "there was no place in the classics for realism," ended his program with a performance of a brief orchestral composition

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 3, 2004

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