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The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor, and Manhood in the Union Army (review)

The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor, and Manhood in the Union Army (review) Minds, not only has Bernath succeeded in extending treatment of south- ern cultural nationalism into the Civil War, thus fi lling an important gap in current studies, but he has also provided a bridge between scholarship on antebellum southern culture and studies of Confederate nationalism. en r ico da l l ag o enrico dal lago, lecturer in American history at the National University of Ireland in Galway, is the author of Agrarian Elites: American Slaveholders and Southern Italian Landowners, 1815–1861 (Louisiana State University Press, 2005). The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor, and Manhood in the Union Army. By Lorien Foote. (New York: New York University Press, 2010. Pp. 256. Cloth, $39.00.) In her insightful and innovative new book, Lorien Foote explores the ways in which the Union army in the Civil War was, as she puts it, “north- ern society in miniature, refl ecting its culture and values and imbued with its strengths and weaknesses” (1). As much as the Union army was at war with Confederate troops, according to Foote, it was also simulta- neously internally at war along fault lines created by changing ideas of what it meant to be a man in a rapidly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor, and Manhood in the Union Army (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (3) – Aug 12, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Minds, not only has Bernath succeeded in extending treatment of south- ern cultural nationalism into the Civil War, thus fi lling an important gap in current studies, but he has also provided a bridge between scholarship on antebellum southern culture and studies of Confederate nationalism. en r ico da l l ag o enrico dal lago, lecturer in American history at the National University of Ireland in Galway, is the author of Agrarian Elites: American Slaveholders and Southern Italian Landowners, 1815–1861 (Louisiana State University Press, 2005). The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Violence, Honor, and Manhood in the Union Army. By Lorien Foote. (New York: New York University Press, 2010. Pp. 256. Cloth, $39.00.) In her insightful and innovative new book, Lorien Foote explores the ways in which the Union army in the Civil War was, as she puts it, “north- ern society in miniature, refl ecting its culture and values and imbued with its strengths and weaknesses” (1). As much as the Union army was at war with Confederate troops, according to Foote, it was also simulta- neously internally at war along fault lines created by changing ideas of what it meant to be a man in a rapidly

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 12, 2011

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