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The Front Porch: "Telling about the South"

The Front Porch: "Telling about the South" The Front Porch "Telling about the South" Dixie, the song tells us, is the place where old times are not forgotten. Reminiscence about the past does seem to be a major preoccupation for many inhabitants of the southern cultural landscape. Stock car fans remember Bobby Allison, the UDC remembers the Lost Cause, black Texans remember Juneteenth, and we all have a holiday to remember Dr. King. Spotting an opportunity, some enterprising publishers have created a major industry by helping us to remember important things like the best recipe for mint juleps, or how to add an authentic hot tub wing onto a suburban Big House, or what nice people will be wearing to next year's Collard Festival. Why the South gets so much mileage out of memory is an interesting question. In a good book called Cavalier and Yankee, the critic William Taylor once wrote that southern nostalgia was invented by sentimental northerners, rather than the old folks at home. Long before the Late Unpleasantness, he claimed, go-getting Yankees longed to believe there was still somewhere in America where time stood still, the livin' was easy, and the tensions of urban commerce melted away like a late spring http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Front Porch: "Telling about the South"

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Front Porch "Telling about the South" Dixie, the song tells us, is the place where old times are not forgotten. Reminiscence about the past does seem to be a major preoccupation for many inhabitants of the southern cultural landscape. Stock car fans remember Bobby Allison, the UDC remembers the Lost Cause, black Texans remember Juneteenth, and we all have a holiday to remember Dr. King. Spotting an opportunity, some enterprising publishers have created a major industry by helping us to remember important things like the best recipe for mint juleps, or how to add an authentic hot tub wing onto a suburban Big House, or what nice people will be wearing to next year's Collard Festival. Why the South gets so much mileage out of memory is an interesting question. In a good book called Cavalier and Yankee, the critic William Taylor once wrote that southern nostalgia was invented by sentimental northerners, rather than the old folks at home. Long before the Late Unpleasantness, he claimed, go-getting Yankees longed to believe there was still somewhere in America where time stood still, the livin' was easy, and the tensions of urban commerce melted away like a late spring

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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