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The Effective Appropriation of History: Carmen Boullosa's Son vacas, somos puercos and Charles Johnson's Middle Passage

The Effective Appropriation of History: Carmen Boullosa's Son vacas, somos puercos and... The Effective Appropriation of History: Carmen Boullosa's Son vacas, somos puercos and Charles Johnson's Middle Passage Jen Flory The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 121-138 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0027 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414739/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST THE EFFECTIVE APPROPRIATION OF HISTORY: CARMEN BOULLOSA'S SON VACAS, SOMOS PUERCOS AND CHARLES JOHNSON'S MIDDLE PASSAGE Jen F lory La verdad es que el novelista no construye, el novelista es un destructor (Boullosa, "La destrucción"). [The truth is that the novelist does not construct, the novelist is a destroyer.] In 1990 and 1991 appeared two novels, set sometime in the past of the Americas, that dealt with the gruesome adventures of groups of sailors involving storms at sea, battles, and even cannibalism. The ships in both stories had repugnant, violent captains who eventually suffered misera- ble deaths, and had crews who exploited other peoples, whether by plun- dering their villages or by transporting them as slaves. However, more important than any similarities in plot, character, or setting, both texts refused to present history as a singular objective truth. Instead, they opened the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Effective Appropriation of History: Carmen Boullosa's Son vacas, somos puercos and Charles Johnson's Middle Passage

The Comparatist , Volume 26 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

The Effective Appropriation of History: Carmen Boullosa's Son vacas, somos puercos and Charles Johnson's Middle Passage Jen Flory The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 121-138 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0027 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414739/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST THE EFFECTIVE APPROPRIATION OF HISTORY: CARMEN BOULLOSA'S SON VACAS, SOMOS PUERCOS AND CHARLES JOHNSON'S MIDDLE PASSAGE Jen F lory La verdad es que el novelista no construye, el novelista es un destructor (Boullosa, "La destrucción"). [The truth is that the novelist does not construct, the novelist is a destroyer.] In 1990 and 1991 appeared two novels, set sometime in the past of the Americas, that dealt with the gruesome adventures of groups of sailors involving storms at sea, battles, and even cannibalism. The ships in both stories had repugnant, violent captains who eventually suffered misera- ble deaths, and had crews who exploited other peoples, whether by plun- dering their villages or by transporting them as slaves. However, more important than any similarities in plot, character, or setting, both texts refused to present history as a singular objective truth. Instead, they opened the

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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