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The Desegregated Heart: A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition (review)

The Desegregated Heart: A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition (review) books The Desegregated Heart A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition By Sarah Patton Boyle, with an introduction by Jennifer Ritterhouse University of Virginia Press, 2001 (originally published by Morrow, 1962) 388 pp. Paper $19.95 Reviewed by Melton McLaurin, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and author most recently of Separate Pasts: Growing Up White in the Segregated South (University of Georgia Press, 1998). In 1950 Sarah Patton Boyle was a typical, perhaps the quintessential, member of Virginia's white elite, convinced that the first families of Virginia, to which she belonged, were composed of the nation's finest and most noble. She was the descendant of English and Scottish nobility, of men who had fought in the American Revolution and served the Confederacy under Stonewall Jackson. She was the daughter of an official in the Episcopal Church and the wife of a faculty member of the University of Virginia. She endured, or believed herself to endure, as all members of her class should, "honorable poverty," the result of defeat in the War Between the States. She was steeped in the myth of the Lost Cause, and firmly convinced that she loved "Negroes"--and that they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Desegregated Heart: A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 8 (1) – Jan 2, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

books The Desegregated Heart A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition By Sarah Patton Boyle, with an introduction by Jennifer Ritterhouse University of Virginia Press, 2001 (originally published by Morrow, 1962) 388 pp. Paper $19.95 Reviewed by Melton McLaurin, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and author most recently of Separate Pasts: Growing Up White in the Segregated South (University of Georgia Press, 1998). In 1950 Sarah Patton Boyle was a typical, perhaps the quintessential, member of Virginia's white elite, convinced that the first families of Virginia, to which she belonged, were composed of the nation's finest and most noble. She was the descendant of English and Scottish nobility, of men who had fought in the American Revolution and served the Confederacy under Stonewall Jackson. She was the daughter of an official in the Episcopal Church and the wife of a faculty member of the University of Virginia. She endured, or believed herself to endure, as all members of her class should, "honorable poverty," the result of defeat in the War Between the States. She was steeped in the myth of the Lost Cause, and firmly convinced that she loved "Negroes"--and that they

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 2, 2002

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