The Complexion of Race: Categories of Difference in Eighteenth-Century British Culture (review)

The Complexion of Race: Categories of Difference in Eighteenth-Century British Culture (review) { 359 eighteenth-century British literary studies, African-American studies, and Black Atlantic studies? While it is true that Phillis Wheatley and Ottobah Cugoano should no longer be measured against the Frederick Douglass standard, is it not also true that early Black Atlantic studies builds on an academic and institutional foundation laid by those who won for Douglass and other Black authors a place on our syllabi and in our universities? The foundational and ongoing efforts of African-Americanists have brought legitimacy, respect, and resources to the study of Black literature and culture; the attraction of early Americanists and eighteenth-century British literature specialists to early Black Atlantic literature is a comparatively recent phenomenon. How does our work profit from the legacy of African-American studies? What might we gain by closer engagement with colleagues who specialize in the longer history of Black literature, politics, religion, and culture? How might we contribute to African-American studies as it continues to develop its Black Atlantic and diasporic aspects? What will we lose by declaring ourselves independent of these larger scholarly conversations, or by failing to reckon with their far-reaching implications? A collection like Genius in Bondage--which comes wearing an orange dust jacket earmarked for the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

The Complexion of Race: Categories of Difference in Eighteenth-Century British Culture (review)

Early American Literature, Volume 37 (2) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

{ 359 eighteenth-century British literary studies, African-American studies, and Black Atlantic studies? While it is true that Phillis Wheatley and Ottobah Cugoano should no longer be measured against the Frederick Douglass standard, is it not also true that early Black Atlantic studies builds on an academic and institutional foundation laid by those who won for Douglass and other Black authors a place on our syllabi and in our universities? The foundational and ongoing efforts of African-Americanists have brought legitimacy, respect, and resources to the study of Black literature and culture; the attraction of early Americanists and eighteenth-century British literature specialists to early Black Atlantic literature is a comparatively recent phenomenon. How does our work profit from the legacy of African-American studies? What might we gain by closer engagement with colleagues who specialize in the longer history of Black literature, politics, religion, and culture? How might we contribute to African-American studies as it continues to develop its Black Atlantic and diasporic aspects? What will we lose by declaring ourselves independent of these larger scholarly conversations, or by failing to reckon with their far-reaching implications? A collection like Genius in Bondage--which comes wearing an orange dust jacket earmarked for the

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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