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The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832–1929 (review)

The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832–1929... The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832–1929. By David A. Chang. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 312. Cloth, $59.95; paper, $22.95.) David A. Chang explores the connection between race and landowner- ship in Creek country during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He fi nds that land and citizenship were intertwined in complicated ways and that land policy could have a profound infl uence on the way people conceptualized race. Chang’s three-part study uses the lens of nationalism to explicate the meaning of Creek tribal sovereignty to diff erent groups, with particular emphasis on capturing the thinking of nonelites. Chang begins by describing changes in Creek notions of property. Traditionally, Creeks owned property communally; in each Creek talwa, or town, matrilineages worked communal fi elds divided into family sections. Women generally performed the agricultural labor, sometimes with the assistance of Creek men. In the eighteenth century, a Creek person had use- rights property in land; that is, one could not own the land but could own the products of her or his labor from the land. Creeks also practiced the enslavement of persons of African descent; however, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832–1929 (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (3) – Aug 29, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832–1929. By David A. Chang. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 312. Cloth, $59.95; paper, $22.95.) David A. Chang explores the connection between race and landowner- ship in Creek country during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He fi nds that land and citizenship were intertwined in complicated ways and that land policy could have a profound infl uence on the way people conceptualized race. Chang’s three-part study uses the lens of nationalism to explicate the meaning of Creek tribal sovereignty to diff erent groups, with particular emphasis on capturing the thinking of nonelites. Chang begins by describing changes in Creek notions of property. Traditionally, Creeks owned property communally; in each Creek talwa, or town, matrilineages worked communal fi elds divided into family sections. Women generally performed the agricultural labor, sometimes with the assistance of Creek men. In the eighteenth century, a Creek person had use- rights property in land; that is, one could not own the land but could own the products of her or his labor from the land. Creeks also practiced the enslavement of persons of African descent; however,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2012

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