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The Color of Music: Social Boundaries and Stereotypes in Southwest Louisiana French Music

The Color of Music: Social Boundaries and Stereotypes in Southwest Louisiana French Music essay ...................... The Color of Music Social Boundaries and Stereotypes in Southwest Louisiana French Music by Sara Le Menestrel One local jazzman rose from a humble start to play with jazz greats Jelly Roll Morton and Buddy Bolden. Rural jazzman Bunk Johnson, the trumpeter credited with teaching Louis Armstrong, first earned his living at the local rice mills and taught music in the New Iberia Public School system under the WPA program. Bunk Johnson at Conrad's Rice Mill, New Iberia, May 1945, photographed by William Russell, courtesy of the William Ransom Hogan Jazz Archive, Tulane University. ntil the 1960s, southwest Louisianans did not categorize their music as Cajun, Creole, or zydeco. Instead, they referred to it as musique française, or French music, without systematically assigning it to a specific ethnic group or music subgenre. The French versus American musical distinction was the significant factor. In fact, this belief was so well-rooted that one Cajun woman who grew up in the 1960s was convinced that the am /fm options on her radio referred to the distinction between American Music and French Music. In recent years, however, artists and intellectuals in southwest Louisiana have increasingly pointed out the historic collaboration http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Color of Music: Social Boundaries and Stereotypes in Southwest Louisiana French Music

Southern Cultures , Volume 13 (3) – Sep 17, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Center for the Study of the American South. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

essay ...................... The Color of Music Social Boundaries and Stereotypes in Southwest Louisiana French Music by Sara Le Menestrel One local jazzman rose from a humble start to play with jazz greats Jelly Roll Morton and Buddy Bolden. Rural jazzman Bunk Johnson, the trumpeter credited with teaching Louis Armstrong, first earned his living at the local rice mills and taught music in the New Iberia Public School system under the WPA program. Bunk Johnson at Conrad's Rice Mill, New Iberia, May 1945, photographed by William Russell, courtesy of the William Ransom Hogan Jazz Archive, Tulane University. ntil the 1960s, southwest Louisianans did not categorize their music as Cajun, Creole, or zydeco. Instead, they referred to it as musique française, or French music, without systematically assigning it to a specific ethnic group or music subgenre. The French versus American musical distinction was the significant factor. In fact, this belief was so well-rooted that one Cajun woman who grew up in the 1960s was convinced that the am /fm options on her radio referred to the distinction between American Music and French Music. In recent years, however, artists and intellectuals in southwest Louisiana have increasingly pointed out the historic collaboration

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 17, 2007

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