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The Civil War in Popular Culture: A Reusable Past (review)

The Civil War in Popular Culture: A Reusable Past (review) Reviews251 fact exonerate him? What message would have been sent to future military officers if Wirz had been spared? The true shame of Andersonville may lie not with Wirz's execution for his management of a Civil War prison, but with the fact that he remains the only soldier, Confederate or Union, who was put to death. The Civil War in Popular Culture: A Reusable Past. By Jim Cullen. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995. 253 pp. Cloth, $29.95. Reviewed by David Glassberg, who teaches modern American history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He also directs the public history program there. His many writings on popular history in America include American Historical Pageantry: The Uses of Tradition in the Early Twentieth Century. The Civil War has been history for more than 130 years. In the decades immediately after Appomattox, Americans developed countless narratives of the war's events. Their versions of the conflict were communicated through soldiers' stories and local commemorative rituals that varied according to whether they lived in the North or the South, were black or white, women or men, rich or poor. In those same decades, two powerful forces emerged, however, that standardized American memories of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

The Civil War in Popular Culture: A Reusable Past (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (2) – Jan 4, 1996

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews251 fact exonerate him? What message would have been sent to future military officers if Wirz had been spared? The true shame of Andersonville may lie not with Wirz's execution for his management of a Civil War prison, but with the fact that he remains the only soldier, Confederate or Union, who was put to death. The Civil War in Popular Culture: A Reusable Past. By Jim Cullen. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995. 253 pp. Cloth, $29.95. Reviewed by David Glassberg, who teaches modern American history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He also directs the public history program there. His many writings on popular history in America include American Historical Pageantry: The Uses of Tradition in the Early Twentieth Century. The Civil War has been history for more than 130 years. In the decades immediately after Appomattox, Americans developed countless narratives of the war's events. Their versions of the conflict were communicated through soldiers' stories and local commemorative rituals that varied according to whether they lived in the North or the South, were black or white, women or men, rich or poor. In those same decades, two powerful forces emerged, however, that standardized American memories of the

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1996

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