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The Civil War's Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy's Free Trade Diplomacy

The Civil War's Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy's Free Trade... marc-wi lliam palen The Civil War’s Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy’s Free Trade Diplomacy As southern states steadily seceded in the fi rst months of 1861, the British press speculated that the Morrill Tariff ’s passage was an underlying cause of secession, or at least a barrier to reunion. Contemporaries on both sides of the Atlantic were well aware that the tariff would greatly aff ect European diplomacy with both North and South, to the former’s detriment and the latter’s favor. The Union’s Morrill Tariff , which Henry C. Carey, the “Ajax of protec- tionism,” infl uenced and lobbied for, contrasted sharply with the South’s free trade advocacy. The Morrill Tariff had been an important component of the 1860 Republican platform, which ended up a tentative triumph for the party’s Whig faction, as it also called for internal improvements, a Pacifi c railroad, and a homestead law. The British, in turn, viewed the pro- tective tariff with great trepidation, as it threatened British manufactures and proved antithetical to a subject about which, as English statesman Richard Cobden pointed out in December 1861, the British “are unani- mous and fanatical”; that subject was free trade. By the time http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Civil War's Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy's Free Trade Diplomacy

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 3 (1) – Feb 13, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

marc-wi lliam palen The Civil War’s Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy’s Free Trade Diplomacy As southern states steadily seceded in the fi rst months of 1861, the British press speculated that the Morrill Tariff ’s passage was an underlying cause of secession, or at least a barrier to reunion. Contemporaries on both sides of the Atlantic were well aware that the tariff would greatly aff ect European diplomacy with both North and South, to the former’s detriment and the latter’s favor. The Union’s Morrill Tariff , which Henry C. Carey, the “Ajax of protec- tionism,” infl uenced and lobbied for, contrasted sharply with the South’s free trade advocacy. The Morrill Tariff had been an important component of the 1860 Republican platform, which ended up a tentative triumph for the party’s Whig faction, as it also called for internal improvements, a Pacifi c railroad, and a homestead law. The British, in turn, viewed the pro- tective tariff with great trepidation, as it threatened British manufactures and proved antithetical to a subject about which, as English statesman Richard Cobden pointed out in December 1861, the British “are unani- mous and fanatical”; that subject was free trade. By the time

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2013

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