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The Catholic Press, the Bible, and Protestant Responsibility for the Civil War

The Catholic Press, the Bible, and Protestant Responsibility for the Civil War mark a. noll The Catholic Press, the Bible, and Protestant Responsibility for the Civil War In his April 3, 1865, diary entry, George Templeton Strong recorded the transcendent exultation he witnessed in New York City when news arrived that Richmond had fallen to Union forces. Strong, a prominent lawyer, founder of the U.S. Sanitary Commission, and a vestryman at Wall Street’s Trinity Episcopal Church, immediately secured permission to ring the bells at Trinity in celebration. His diary entry, headed “Petersburg and Richmond! Gloria in Excelsis Deo,” underscored the harmony of religious and civic sentiments that fueled the city’s jubilation. A great crowd, he wrote, “a rude, many-voiced chorale,” repeatedly sang “the last two lines” of the national anthem “with a massive roar.” As religious ardor rose with patriotic zeal, the throng also joined in singing the “Doxology” (“Praise God from whom all blessings flow”) and “Old Hundred” (“All people that on earth do dwell / Sing to the Lord with cheerful voice”).1 Two days earlier, the New York Tablet had also offered a religiously inflected meditation on the end of the nation’s bloody civil conflict. Yet, rather than synthesizing civic and Christian jubilation, this Catholic newspaper answered its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The Catholic Press, the Bible, and Protestant Responsibility for the Civil War

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 7 (3) – Aug 24, 2017

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

mark a. noll The Catholic Press, the Bible, and Protestant Responsibility for the Civil War In his April 3, 1865, diary entry, George Templeton Strong recorded the transcendent exultation he witnessed in New York City when news arrived that Richmond had fallen to Union forces. Strong, a prominent lawyer, founder of the U.S. Sanitary Commission, and a vestryman at Wall Street’s Trinity Episcopal Church, immediately secured permission to ring the bells at Trinity in celebration. His diary entry, headed “Petersburg and Richmond! Gloria in Excelsis Deo,” underscored the harmony of religious and civic sentiments that fueled the city’s jubilation. A great crowd, he wrote, “a rude, many-voiced chorale,” repeatedly sang “the last two lines” of the national anthem “with a massive roar.” As religious ardor rose with patriotic zeal, the throng also joined in singing the “Doxology” (“Praise God from whom all blessings flow”) and “Old Hundred” (“All people that on earth do dwell / Sing to the Lord with cheerful voice”).1 Two days earlier, the New York Tablet had also offered a religiously inflected meditation on the end of the nation’s bloody civil conflict. Yet, rather than synthesizing civic and Christian jubilation, this Catholic newspaper answered its

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 24, 2017

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