"The Boys Will Have to Fight the Battles without Me": The Making of Sam Davis, "Boy Hero of the Confederacy"

"The Boys Will Have to Fight the Battles without Me": The Making of Sam Davis, "Boy Hero of the... essay ...................... "The Boys Will Have to Fight the Battles without Me" , "Boy Hero of the Confederacy" by Edward John Harcourt Executed as a spy in 1863, Sam Davis would be memorialized as the Confederate "boy hero" by the Lost Cause movement. Today, Davis's boyhood home is a popular Tennessee tourist attraction. A Sam Davis reenactor at the Sam Davis Home, courtesy of the Rutherford County Convention and Visitors Bureau. n a recent Confederate Memorial Day at the Tennessee State Capitol, the General Joseph E. Johnston Camp No. 28, Sons of Confederate Veterans (scv), performed a pathetic little ceremony under the portico of the antebellum building. A small band of die-hards, their numbers were more than doubled by curious tourists, conscripted children, and an entertainment troupe called the Dixie Picks. A history professor from a local community college began proceedings with an angry and passionate recitation of Father Abram Joseph Ryan's poem to the battle flag. Turning southwards, the speaker pointed to the statue of the Confederate martyr Sam Davis, erected on Capitol grounds in 1909, and proclaimed that the story of the "boy hero" was "a living reminder of the valor of your flesh and blood." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"The Boys Will Have to Fight the Battles without Me": The Making of Sam Davis, "Boy Hero of the Confederacy"

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Abstract

essay ...................... "The Boys Will Have to Fight the Battles without Me" , "Boy Hero of the Confederacy" by Edward John Harcourt Executed as a spy in 1863, Sam Davis would be memorialized as the Confederate "boy hero" by the Lost Cause movement. Today, Davis's boyhood home is a popular Tennessee tourist attraction. A Sam Davis reenactor at the Sam Davis Home, courtesy of the Rutherford County Convention and Visitors Bureau. n a recent Confederate Memorial Day at the Tennessee State Capitol, the General Joseph E. Johnston Camp No. 28, Sons of Confederate Veterans (scv), performed a pathetic little ceremony under the portico of the antebellum building. A small band of die-hards, their numbers were more than doubled by curious tourists, conscripted children, and an entertainment troupe called the Dixie Picks. A history professor from a local community college began proceedings with an angry and passionate recitation of Father Abram Joseph Ryan's poem to the battle flag. Turning southwards, the speaker pointed to the statue of the Confederate martyr Sam Davis, erected on Capitol grounds in 1909, and proclaimed that the story of the "boy hero" was "a living reminder of the valor of your flesh and blood."

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 3, 2006

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