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The American Antiquarian Society, 1812-2012: A Bicentennial History by Philip F. Gura (review)

The American Antiquarian Society, 1812-2012: A Bicentennial History by Philip F. Gura (review) 258 }eARLY AMeRICAn LIteRAtURe: VoLUMe 48, nUMBeR 1 Finally, however, these are minor quibbles compared to the contributions of this volume. The editors have altered and expanded the canon of revolutionary-era writing and shifted the terms in which we can discuss it. The effect is analogous to the appearance of Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic: we can no longer speak about "the age of revolutions" without questioning the failure of women to be fully included in this rhetoric or in the momentous changes that swept the globe. While the selections reaffirm, as the editors observe, "the abiding revolutionary power of writing and reading" as well as "the value of affiliating and organizing with other women" in a "lived form of revolution" (33), they also bring home the exclusions, violence, coercions, and oppression of a period in which the foundations of contemporary feminisms were laid. The promise is incomplete and the "revolution" is ongoing, this collection implies. These are important lesson as we enter into another age of agitation and change. IVY sCHWeItZeR Dartmouth College The American Antiquarian Society, 1812­2012: A Bicentennial History PHILIP F. GURA New Castle: Oak Knoll Press, 2012 454 pp. Two centuries ago the Patriot http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

The American Antiquarian Society, 1812-2012: A Bicentennial History by Philip F. Gura (review)

Early American Literature , Volume 48 (1) – Mar 6, 2013

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
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1534-147X
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Abstract

258 }eARLY AMeRICAn LIteRAtURe: VoLUMe 48, nUMBeR 1 Finally, however, these are minor quibbles compared to the contributions of this volume. The editors have altered and expanded the canon of revolutionary-era writing and shifted the terms in which we can discuss it. The effect is analogous to the appearance of Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic: we can no longer speak about "the age of revolutions" without questioning the failure of women to be fully included in this rhetoric or in the momentous changes that swept the globe. While the selections reaffirm, as the editors observe, "the abiding revolutionary power of writing and reading" as well as "the value of affiliating and organizing with other women" in a "lived form of revolution" (33), they also bring home the exclusions, violence, coercions, and oppression of a period in which the foundations of contemporary feminisms were laid. The promise is incomplete and the "revolution" is ongoing, this collection implies. These are important lesson as we enter into another age of agitation and change. IVY sCHWeItZeR Dartmouth College The American Antiquarian Society, 1812­2012: A Bicentennial History PHILIP F. GURA New Castle: Oak Knoll Press, 2012 454 pp. Two centuries ago the Patriot

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2013

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