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The After Slavery Website: A New Online Resource for Teaching U.S. Slave Emancipation

The After Slavery Website: A New Online Resource for Teaching U.S. Slave Emancipation pr o fessional notes The After Slavery Website A New Online Resource for Teaching U.S. Slave Emancipation brian kelly & john w. white There cannot be many serious students of the American past unimpressed by the scale of the interpretive shift in the historiography of slave emancipation over the past generation. "No part of the American experience," Eric Foner asserted on the very first page of the preface to his Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution in 1988, has seen such "a broadly accepted point of view so completely overturned as [the period of ] Reconstruction."1 Unqualified assertions like this frequently come back to haunt scholars, but more than twenty years later Foner's assessment seems measured, judicious, and not the least bit hyperbolic. While this revolution in historiography has gradually come to be reflected in the content of traditional teaching materials, the shortage of quality online resources aimed at conveying the significance of the struggles accompanying slave emancipation is striking. One resource that has recently emerged to fill this void is the Online Classroom on the After Slavery project website (www.afterslavery.com), which combines primary and secondary sources to enable students and teachers to interpret this period for themselves. Until the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

The After Slavery Website: A New Online Resource for Teaching U.S. Slave Emancipation

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

pr o fessional notes The After Slavery Website A New Online Resource for Teaching U.S. Slave Emancipation brian kelly & john w. white There cannot be many serious students of the American past unimpressed by the scale of the interpretive shift in the historiography of slave emancipation over the past generation. "No part of the American experience," Eric Foner asserted on the very first page of the preface to his Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution in 1988, has seen such "a broadly accepted point of view so completely overturned as [the period of ] Reconstruction."1 Unqualified assertions like this frequently come back to haunt scholars, but more than twenty years later Foner's assessment seems measured, judicious, and not the least bit hyperbolic. While this revolution in historiography has gradually come to be reflected in the content of traditional teaching materials, the shortage of quality online resources aimed at conveying the significance of the struggles accompanying slave emancipation is striking. One resource that has recently emerged to fill this void is the Online Classroom on the After Slavery project website (www.afterslavery.com), which combines primary and secondary sources to enable students and teachers to interpret this period for themselves. Until the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

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