The Aesthetic Contract: Statutes of Art and Intellectual Work in Modernity (review)

The Aesthetic Contract: Statutes of Art and Intellectual Work in Modernity (review) REVIEWS ern society because it does not realize their high goals for it, there are also the alienated outsiders, those citizens of the Third World, who chafe under Western technological dominance. Unwilling to accept blame for their current state, some such citizens often create utopie, prehistoric pasts that prevent them from clearly addressing current and future problems. Armed with these heroic myths, they further defend themselves by pointing to the cause ofall their difficulties--the colonizing West, ignoring any greater, or other, Western cultural contributions. Both frustrated insiders and equally despairing outsiders, then, give a fractured view of the West to compensate either for their own undeveloped, and hence never-to-berealized, desires for utopia, Marxist or otherwise, or for their equally immature inability to deal with their own problems in any way other than to lay blame elsewhere. Paradoxically, in saluting "[fjhose many brave and humane Africans who are struggling these days for decent societies," Ellis sees their inspiration coming from the political and philosophic ideals of the West, the very region the other members of their culture seek out as a scapegoat. After carefully tracing "The Origins of Political Correctness" in chapter one, Ellis treats "The Diversity ofLiterature." Once http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

The Aesthetic Contract: Statutes of Art and Intellectual Work in Modernity (review)

The Comparatist, Volume 23 (1) – Oct 3, 1999

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS ern society because it does not realize their high goals for it, there are also the alienated outsiders, those citizens of the Third World, who chafe under Western technological dominance. Unwilling to accept blame for their current state, some such citizens often create utopie, prehistoric pasts that prevent them from clearly addressing current and future problems. Armed with these heroic myths, they further defend themselves by pointing to the cause ofall their difficulties--the colonizing West, ignoring any greater, or other, Western cultural contributions. Both frustrated insiders and equally despairing outsiders, then, give a fractured view of the West to compensate either for their own undeveloped, and hence never-to-berealized, desires for utopia, Marxist or otherwise, or for their equally immature inability to deal with their own problems in any way other than to lay blame elsewhere. Paradoxically, in saluting "[fjhose many brave and humane Africans who are struggling these days for decent societies," Ellis sees their inspiration coming from the political and philosophic ideals of the West, the very region the other members of their culture seek out as a scapegoat. After carefully tracing "The Origins of Political Correctness" in chapter one, Ellis treats "The Diversity ofLiterature." Once

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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