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Testing Models of Collaboration among High School Science Teachers in an Electronic Environment

Testing Models of Collaboration among High School Science Teachers in an Electronic Environment <p> This study aims to test Fishbough&apos;s models of collaboration and investigate the use of e-mail and the Internet among science teachers in government secondary schools in two school districts Perth, Western Australia. A mail questionnaire and face-to-face interview techniques were used together to collect data. Thirty-one science teachers from 24 government secondary schools responding to the questionnaire that asked about their collaboration. Results indicate that those science teachers rarely use the Consulting model and very seldom use the Coaching and Teaming models for their collaboration. Most of the sample science teachers had negative perceptions of the potential of collaboration on the Internet. However, some of them wanted to collaborate with other science teachers if they had sufficient computing skills, aim and direction for their collaboration; particularly, time and a technician to support this activity. These results have important implications for decisions regarding collaboration as a significant strategy to improve teaching.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Testing Models of Collaboration among High School Science Teachers in an Electronic Environment

The High School Journal , Volume 89 (3) – Feb 21, 2006

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

<p> This study aims to test Fishbough&apos;s models of collaboration and investigate the use of e-mail and the Internet among science teachers in government secondary schools in two school districts Perth, Western Australia. A mail questionnaire and face-to-face interview techniques were used together to collect data. Thirty-one science teachers from 24 government secondary schools responding to the questionnaire that asked about their collaboration. Results indicate that those science teachers rarely use the Consulting model and very seldom use the Coaching and Teaming models for their collaboration. Most of the sample science teachers had negative perceptions of the potential of collaboration on the Internet. However, some of them wanted to collaborate with other science teachers if they had sufficient computing skills, aim and direction for their collaboration; particularly, time and a technician to support this activity. These results have important implications for decisions regarding collaboration as a significant strategy to improve teaching.</p>

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 21, 2006

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