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Teaching the New Departure: The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony

Teaching the New Departure: The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony pr o fessional notes Teaching the New Departure The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony kathi kern & linda levstik When Susan B. Anthony stood trial for voting illegally in the federal election of 1872, she was not permitted to testify in her own defense. The judge, however, allowed the prisoner to address the court, a moment for which she was entirely prepared. In a speech that has often been regarded as the most famous address on behalf of women's rights, Anthony advised Justice Ward Hunt that just as the slaves got their freedom by taking it "over, or under, or through the unjust forms of law," now must women "to get their right to a voice in this government, take it; as I have taken mine, and mean to take it at every possible opportunity."1 For Anthony and hundreds of other women in the early years of Reconstruction, "taking" their freedom meant exacting their rights at the point where citizenship was "produced": the polling booth.2 This strategy came to be known as the "New Departure." Between 1868 and 1873, at least seven hundred women that we know of voted or attempted to vote in local, state, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Teaching the New Departure: The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (1) – Feb 23, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

pr o fessional notes Teaching the New Departure The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony kathi kern & linda levstik When Susan B. Anthony stood trial for voting illegally in the federal election of 1872, she was not permitted to testify in her own defense. The judge, however, allowed the prisoner to address the court, a moment for which she was entirely prepared. In a speech that has often been regarded as the most famous address on behalf of women's rights, Anthony advised Justice Ward Hunt that just as the slaves got their freedom by taking it "over, or under, or through the unjust forms of law," now must women "to get their right to a voice in this government, take it; as I have taken mine, and mean to take it at every possible opportunity."1 For Anthony and hundreds of other women in the early years of Reconstruction, "taking" their freedom meant exacting their rights at the point where citizenship was "produced": the polling booth.2 This strategy came to be known as the "New Departure." Between 1868 and 1873, at least seven hundred women that we know of voted or attempted to vote in local, state, and

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 23, 2012

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