Teaching Gone with the Wind in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam

Teaching Gone with the Wind in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam ESSAY ...................... by Mart Stewart On a Fulbright Scholarship in Ho Chi Minh City, the author used Gone with the Wind, a popular novel in Vietnam, to teach seminars on regionalism, the American South, and collective memory. The course led to some unexpected observations on Vietnam's own "civil war," defeated south, and postwar society. n his tour through modern Georgia in search of memories of the Old South, Tony Horwitz marveled at Japanese tourists' fascination with Gone with the Wind and observed the exchanges between them and a busy Vivien Leigh­Scarlett O' Hara impersonator, Melly Meadows. Meadows had taken her act to Tokyo and boasted that she had once shown her red pantalets to a delighted Japanese Empress. She had learned some Japanese to banter with the tourists who contracted for her appearances in Atlanta, and from these exchanges, she speculated that the Japanese had a "special affinity" for Gone with the Wind (GWTW ) because of a kindred attraction to traditional notions of femininity and because they, like southerners, had rebuilt their country after a devastating war. Horwitz mentions other sources of attraction: Scarlett's loyalty to family, her strength, and the "subtle, mannered code" that both Japanese http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Teaching Gone with the Wind in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam

Southern Cultures, Volume 11 (3) – Aug 29, 2005

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

ESSAY ...................... by Mart Stewart On a Fulbright Scholarship in Ho Chi Minh City, the author used Gone with the Wind, a popular novel in Vietnam, to teach seminars on regionalism, the American South, and collective memory. The course led to some unexpected observations on Vietnam's own "civil war," defeated south, and postwar society. n his tour through modern Georgia in search of memories of the Old South, Tony Horwitz marveled at Japanese tourists' fascination with Gone with the Wind and observed the exchanges between them and a busy Vivien Leigh­Scarlett O' Hara impersonator, Melly Meadows. Meadows had taken her act to Tokyo and boasted that she had once shown her red pantalets to a delighted Japanese Empress. She had learned some Japanese to banter with the tourists who contracted for her appearances in Atlanta, and from these exchanges, she speculated that the Japanese had a "special affinity" for Gone with the Wind (GWTW ) because of a kindred attraction to traditional notions of femininity and because they, like southerners, had rebuilt their country after a devastating war. Horwitz mentions other sources of attraction: Scarlett's loyalty to family, her strength, and the "subtle, mannered code" that both Japanese

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2005

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