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Teacher Burnout In Special Education: The Causes and The Recommended Solutions

Teacher Burnout In Special Education: The Causes and The Recommended Solutions Cecil Fore, III, Ph.D. The University of Georgia Christopher Martin, M.Ed. The University of Georgia William N. Bender, Ph.D. The University of Georgia Introduction While many areas in education are experiencing teacher shortages (McKnab, 1995; Merrow, 1999), the retention of special education teachers in particular is a critical concern in many schools across the nation. Even prior to the developing national teacher shortage, educators were voicing concerns about higher burnout and/or teacher attrition rates in special education as compared to general education (National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 1990). Many anticipate that the national teacher shortage may only exacerbate this growing need for special educators. McKnab (1995), for example, estimated the annual attrition rate for special education teachers as between 9% and 10%, as compared to 6% among educators in other areas. More recently, a national survey of over 1,000 special educators conducted by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) concluded: "Poor teacher working conditions contribute to the high rate of special educators leaving the field, teacher burnout, and substandard quality of education for students with special needs" (CEC, 1998). Clearly, hidden within the growing national teacher shortage in all certification areas, the ongoing burnout of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Teacher Burnout In Special Education: The Causes and The Recommended Solutions

The High School Journal , Volume 86 (1) – Jan 10, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

Cecil Fore, III, Ph.D. The University of Georgia Christopher Martin, M.Ed. The University of Georgia William N. Bender, Ph.D. The University of Georgia Introduction While many areas in education are experiencing teacher shortages (McKnab, 1995; Merrow, 1999), the retention of special education teachers in particular is a critical concern in many schools across the nation. Even prior to the developing national teacher shortage, educators were voicing concerns about higher burnout and/or teacher attrition rates in special education as compared to general education (National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 1990). Many anticipate that the national teacher shortage may only exacerbate this growing need for special educators. McKnab (1995), for example, estimated the annual attrition rate for special education teachers as between 9% and 10%, as compared to 6% among educators in other areas. More recently, a national survey of over 1,000 special educators conducted by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) concluded: "Poor teacher working conditions contribute to the high rate of special educators leaving the field, teacher burnout, and substandard quality of education for students with special needs" (CEC, 1998). Clearly, hidden within the growing national teacher shortage in all certification areas, the ongoing burnout of

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

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