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Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto and the Battle for Equality in Civil War America (review)

Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto and the Battle for Equality in Civil War America (review) andrea volpe is a lecturer in writing at MIT. She is at work on National Bodies: Carte de Visite Portraits and the Politics of Photography in Civil War America. Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto and the Battle for Equality in Civil War America. By Daniel R. Biddle and Murray Dubin. (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2010. Pp. 616. Cloth, $35.00.) Award-winning Philadelphia Inquirer reporters Dan Biddle and Murray Dubin populate their dramatic story of the life and premature death of Octavius Catto, United States Colored Troops recruiter and civil rights activist, with heroes and villains, street battles, riots, mayhem and murder. Though an obscure fi gure today, Catto played a leading role in the struggle for black equality in the era of emancipation; he stood at the center of a lively community of black activists in Philadelphia and beyond. The authors follow the lives and careers of a number of Catto’s friends and associates—the “band of brothers,” as they called themselves, even though there were prominent women activists among them. Included in this group were William T. Catto (Catto’s father), Frederick Douglass, William Still, and many other members of Philadelphia’s elite black com- munity. And then there were the villains, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto and the Battle for Equality in Civil War America (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

andrea volpe is a lecturer in writing at MIT. She is at work on National Bodies: Carte de Visite Portraits and the Politics of Photography in Civil War America. Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto and the Battle for Equality in Civil War America. By Daniel R. Biddle and Murray Dubin. (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2010. Pp. 616. Cloth, $35.00.) Award-winning Philadelphia Inquirer reporters Dan Biddle and Murray Dubin populate their dramatic story of the life and premature death of Octavius Catto, United States Colored Troops recruiter and civil rights activist, with heroes and villains, street battles, riots, mayhem and murder. Though an obscure fi gure today, Catto played a leading role in the struggle for black equality in the era of emancipation; he stood at the center of a lively community of black activists in Philadelphia and beyond. The authors follow the lives and careers of a number of Catto’s friends and associates—the “band of brothers,” as they called themselves, even though there were prominent women activists among them. Included in this group were William T. Catto (Catto’s father), Frederick Douglass, William Still, and many other members of Philadelphia’s elite black com- munity. And then there were the villains, the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2012

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