Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure: Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape

Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure: Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape Essay .................... Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape by William D. Bryan John Muir marveled at Bonaventure’s landscape, and declared it “one of the most impressive assemblages of animal and plant creatures I ever met”—high praise from the future founder of the Sierra Club. Bonaventure Cemetery, by Krissa Corbett Cavouras, February 27, 2012, Flickr.com, CC BY-­ C-­ D 2.0. N N   n 1869, twenty-­ ine-­ ear-­ ld John Muir left his home in Indian y o napolis and began to walk south. With Florida as his goal, Muir botanized his way through Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia, before stopping in Savannah. There, he ran out of money and had to spend almost a week “camping among the tombs” in Bonaventure Cemetery, a private cemetery just a few miles outside the city. Muir marveled at Bonaventure’s landscape, and declared it “one of the most impressive assemblages of animal and plant creatures I ever met”—high praise from the future founder of the Sierra Club. Although intended for the dead, the cemetery was a living ecosystem replete with Spanish moss, bald eagles, “large flocks of butterflies, [and] all kinds of happy insects,” and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure: Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape

Southern Cultures, Volume 23 (2) – Jul 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Essay .................... Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape by William D. Bryan John Muir marveled at Bonaventure’s landscape, and declared it “one of the most impressive assemblages of animal and plant creatures I ever met”—high praise from the future founder of the Sierra Club. Bonaventure Cemetery, by Krissa Corbett Cavouras, February 27, 2012, Flickr.com, CC BY-­ C-­ D 2.0. N N   n 1869, twenty-­ ine-­ ear-­ ld John Muir left his home in Indian y o napolis and began to walk south. With Florida as his goal, Muir botanized his way through Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia, before stopping in Savannah. There, he ran out of money and had to spend almost a week “camping among the tombs” in Bonaventure Cemetery, a private cemetery just a few miles outside the city. Muir marveled at Bonaventure’s landscape, and declared it “one of the most impressive assemblages of animal and plant creatures I ever met”—high praise from the future founder of the Sierra Club. Although intended for the dead, the cemetery was a living ecosystem replete with Spanish moss, bald eagles, “large flocks of butterflies, [and] all kinds of happy insects,” and

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 20, 2017

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