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Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas by Jeffrey Ostler (review)

Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding... book revi ews Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas. By Jeffrey Ostler. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2019. Pp. 564. Cloth, $37.50; paper, $25.00.) The first installment of a projected two-volume history, Surviving Genocide offers a sweeping synthesis of American settler colonialism and its devastating consequences for Indigenous people east of the Mississippi River from the 1760s to the 1850s. Rather than provide a traditional his- tory of “Indian policy” centered on the actions of American officials and bureaucrats, Jeffrey Ostler chronicles the ways that Native nations expe - rienced, endured, and survived the impact of American expansion and its often genocidal “forces of destruction” (6). Ostler divides Surviving Genocide into three broad parts that move lu- cidly from the colonial origins of the United States to the events of Bleed- ing Kansas, seen from the perspective of the dispossessed Kanza Nation. While specialists will be familiar with the broad contours of this story, Ostler’s cross-regional, multinational focus often shows events in rich new lights. His sections on Indian removal, for instance, build on pathbreak- ing recent work expanding the geographies and chronologies of removal by historians such as John http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas by Jeffrey Ostler (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (3) – Aug 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

book revi ews Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas. By Jeffrey Ostler. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2019. Pp. 564. Cloth, $37.50; paper, $25.00.) The first installment of a projected two-volume history, Surviving Genocide offers a sweeping synthesis of American settler colonialism and its devastating consequences for Indigenous people east of the Mississippi River from the 1760s to the 1850s. Rather than provide a traditional his- tory of “Indian policy” centered on the actions of American officials and bureaucrats, Jeffrey Ostler chronicles the ways that Native nations expe - rienced, endured, and survived the impact of American expansion and its often genocidal “forces of destruction” (6). Ostler divides Surviving Genocide into three broad parts that move lu- cidly from the colonial origins of the United States to the events of Bleed- ing Kansas, seen from the perspective of the dispossessed Kanza Nation. While specialists will be familiar with the broad contours of this story, Ostler’s cross-regional, multinational focus often shows events in rich new lights. His sections on Indian removal, for instance, build on pathbreak- ing recent work expanding the geographies and chronologies of removal by historians such as John

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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