Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Sundays in the Streets: The Long History of Benevolence, Self-Help, and Parades in New Orleans

Sundays in the Streets: The Long History of Benevolence, Self-Help, and Parades in New Orleans Essa y .................... Sundays in the Streets The Long History of Benevolence, Self- Help, and Parades in New Orleans by Leslie Gale Parr “Everybody in New Orleans was always organization- minded.” —Jelly Roll Morton Junior Buckjumpers, 2009. All photos courtesy of the author. 8 ven in a nation inclined to “constantly form associations,” as de Tocqueville observed in 1831, residents of New Orleans excelled in organizing lodges, religious groups, literary societies, chari- table organizations, sporting clubs, social clubs, and, most of E   all, benevolent associations, the most popular—and practical— organizations to which New Orleans’ polyglot population flocked. By 1880, these organizations (also referred to as mutual aid societies) had become “an integral part of life in the city for both blacks and whites,” acting as hybrid insurance/ social clubs for their members, providing doctor’s care, sickness and disability pensions, death benefits to survivors, and funeral and burial arrangements for members and their dependents. By the mid- t wentieth century, however, they had begun to change their focus, becoming less about insurance and more about so- cializing. Despite these die ff rences, we can still see the influence of the original be - nevolent associations in today’s social aid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Sundays in the Streets: The Long History of Benevolence, Self-Help, and Parades in New Orleans

Southern Cultures , Volume 22 (4) – Dec 11, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/sundays-in-the-streets-the-long-history-of-benevolence-self-help-and-s3tJx9kYzR
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

Essa y .................... Sundays in the Streets The Long History of Benevolence, Self- Help, and Parades in New Orleans by Leslie Gale Parr “Everybody in New Orleans was always organization- minded.” —Jelly Roll Morton Junior Buckjumpers, 2009. All photos courtesy of the author. 8 ven in a nation inclined to “constantly form associations,” as de Tocqueville observed in 1831, residents of New Orleans excelled in organizing lodges, religious groups, literary societies, chari- table organizations, sporting clubs, social clubs, and, most of E   all, benevolent associations, the most popular—and practical— organizations to which New Orleans’ polyglot population flocked. By 1880, these organizations (also referred to as mutual aid societies) had become “an integral part of life in the city for both blacks and whites,” acting as hybrid insurance/ social clubs for their members, providing doctor’s care, sickness and disability pensions, death benefits to survivors, and funeral and burial arrangements for members and their dependents. By the mid- t wentieth century, however, they had begun to change their focus, becoming less about insurance and more about so- cializing. Despite these die ff rences, we can still see the influence of the original be - nevolent associations in today’s social aid

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 11, 2016

There are no references for this article.