Sublime Rupert and Beautiful Lenny: Aesthetics and Temporality in Scorsese's The King of Comedy and Fosse's Lenny

Sublime Rupert and Beautiful Lenny: Aesthetics and Temporality in Scorsese's The King of Comedy... THE COMPARATIST SUBLIME RUPERT AND BEAUTIFUL LENNY: AESTHETICS AND TEMPORALITY IN SCORSESE'S THE KING OF COMEDYAND FOSSE'S LENNY Nikita Nankov Being announces itself in the imperative. [. . J But being is not meaning. (Jean-François Lyotard1) The development of the culture industry has led to the predominance of the effect, the obvious touch, and the technical detail over the work itself--which once expressed an idea, but was liquidated together with the idea. (Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer 9) At the beginning of The King of Comedy (1983), a film directed by Martin Scorsese, there is a key scene, which, however, seems so trivial that it hardly attracts attention: Jerry Langford (Jerry Lewis), a talk-show host, tries to get rid of Rupert Pupkin (Robert De Niro), a pushy, aspiring stand-up comic who wants to become a guest on Jerry's TV show. Let us give an ear to Jerry's hackneyed recipe for how to become a star: [T]his is a crazy business but it's not unlike any other business. There are ground rules. And you don't just walk on to a network show without experience. [. . .] You've got to start at the bottom. [. . .] It looks http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Sublime Rupert and Beautiful Lenny: Aesthetics and Temporality in Scorsese's The King of Comedy and Fosse's Lenny

The Comparatist, Volume 28 (1) – Oct 3, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/sublime-rupert-and-beautiful-lenny-aesthetics-and-temporality-in-Ag7zCKT2m3
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE COMPARATIST SUBLIME RUPERT AND BEAUTIFUL LENNY: AESTHETICS AND TEMPORALITY IN SCORSESE'S THE KING OF COMEDYAND FOSSE'S LENNY Nikita Nankov Being announces itself in the imperative. [. . J But being is not meaning. (Jean-François Lyotard1) The development of the culture industry has led to the predominance of the effect, the obvious touch, and the technical detail over the work itself--which once expressed an idea, but was liquidated together with the idea. (Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer 9) At the beginning of The King of Comedy (1983), a film directed by Martin Scorsese, there is a key scene, which, however, seems so trivial that it hardly attracts attention: Jerry Langford (Jerry Lewis), a talk-show host, tries to get rid of Rupert Pupkin (Robert De Niro), a pushy, aspiring stand-up comic who wants to become a guest on Jerry's TV show. Let us give an ear to Jerry's hackneyed recipe for how to become a star: [T]his is a crazy business but it's not unlike any other business. There are ground rules. And you don't just walk on to a network show without experience. [. . .] You've got to start at the bottom. [. . .] It looks

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off