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Student Use of Aspirational and Linguistic Social Capital in an Urban Immigrant-Centered English Immersion High School

Student Use of Aspirational and Linguistic Social Capital in an Urban Immigrant-Centered English... Expanding upon Yosso’s theory of <i>community cultural wealth</i>, this interview-based qualitative study finds that Mexican youth in an urban two-year English immersion high school here referred to as Literacy High are assisted academically by what Yosso would call their <i>aspirational capital</i> and what the present article theorizes as their <i>linguistic social capital</i>, or their ability to utilize a Spanish-speaking student network to understand assignments and instructions. Among these students, opinions regarding the need to develop oral English proficiency vary widely, with some students choosing Spanish as a form of resistance while others feel anxiety regarding their lack of fluency in spoken English. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Student Use of Aspirational and Linguistic Social Capital in an Urban Immigrant-Centered English Immersion High School

The High School Journal , Volume 97 (2) – Jan 25, 2014

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Expanding upon Yosso’s theory of <i>community cultural wealth</i>, this interview-based qualitative study finds that Mexican youth in an urban two-year English immersion high school here referred to as Literacy High are assisted academically by what Yosso would call their <i>aspirational capital</i> and what the present article theorizes as their <i>linguistic social capital</i>, or their ability to utilize a Spanish-speaking student network to understand assignments and instructions. Among these students, opinions regarding the need to develop oral English proficiency vary widely, with some students choosing Spanish as a form of resistance while others feel anxiety regarding their lack of fluency in spoken English.

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 25, 2014

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