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Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates Jr. (review)

Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates... people precisely because of how their complicated questions about rac- ism, government power, and national unity continue to plague Americans today. In the process, however, Wineapple also paints a nuanced portrait of many of the individuals who were involved, whether directly or indirectly, with the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. At times, the cast of characters in The Impeachers threatens to over- whelm an otherwise clear and concise story of Reconstruction and political crises. But one of the strengths of Wineapple’s book is quickly explain- ing the importance of each new person introduced in her narrative, and how they reflected larger national trends in political, social, and cultural thought. While much of it may be well-known information for Civil War and Reconstruction historians, having so much information in one clear narrative will prove to be a boon to scholars considering fresh angles on the Reconstruction period. While Johnson was acquitted, Wineapple wants to save the impeach- ment of 1868 from merely being an interesting tidbit from a chaotic era of political intrigue and racial strife. It was, above all, about preserv- ing the victory of the Federal government in 1865 over the reactionary Confederacy. Wineapple appreciates and, indeed, writes about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates Jr. (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (3) – Aug 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

people precisely because of how their complicated questions about rac- ism, government power, and national unity continue to plague Americans today. In the process, however, Wineapple also paints a nuanced portrait of many of the individuals who were involved, whether directly or indirectly, with the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. At times, the cast of characters in The Impeachers threatens to over- whelm an otherwise clear and concise story of Reconstruction and political crises. But one of the strengths of Wineapple’s book is quickly explain- ing the importance of each new person introduced in her narrative, and how they reflected larger national trends in political, social, and cultural thought. While much of it may be well-known information for Civil War and Reconstruction historians, having so much information in one clear narrative will prove to be a boon to scholars considering fresh angles on the Reconstruction period. While Johnson was acquitted, Wineapple wants to save the impeach- ment of 1868 from merely being an interesting tidbit from a chaotic era of political intrigue and racial strife. It was, above all, about preserv- ing the victory of the Federal government in 1865 over the reactionary Confederacy. Wineapple appreciates and, indeed, writes about

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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