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Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History (review)

Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History (review) Still Fighting the Civil War The American South and Southern History by David Goldfield Louisiana State University Press, 2002 354 pp. Cloth, $34.95 Reviewed by David W. Blight, professor of history at Yale University and author of Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. In this provocative book on an old subject, written for a broad audience, David Goldfield maintains that southerners have, since 1865, lived under a "burden" of history and memory. The southerner, writes Goldfield, is "either fixated upon the past and therefore immobilized by it, or . . . a total amnesiac and therefore destructive." Still Fighting the Civil War is one historian's update of W. J. Cash's The Mind of the South, which also returns to the themes of irony, identity, and the weight of a peculiar past in C. Vann Woodward's The Burden of Southern History. This is not a work of research scholarship, but a commentary, rooted in a wide reading of secondary sources, fiction, and journalism, about "why southerners have remembered the Civil War and Reconstruction as they have." With a wonderful eye for the memorable quotation and some graceful prose of his own, Goldfield examines how and why http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 9 (2)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Still Fighting the Civil War The American South and Southern History by David Goldfield Louisiana State University Press, 2002 354 pp. Cloth, $34.95 Reviewed by David W. Blight, professor of history at Yale University and author of Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. In this provocative book on an old subject, written for a broad audience, David Goldfield maintains that southerners have, since 1865, lived under a "burden" of history and memory. The southerner, writes Goldfield, is "either fixated upon the past and therefore immobilized by it, or . . . a total amnesiac and therefore destructive." Still Fighting the Civil War is one historian's update of W. J. Cash's The Mind of the South, which also returns to the themes of irony, identity, and the weight of a peculiar past in C. Vann Woodward's The Burden of Southern History. This is not a work of research scholarship, but a commentary, rooted in a wide reading of secondary sources, fiction, and journalism, about "why southerners have remembered the Civil War and Reconstruction as they have." With a wonderful eye for the memorable quotation and some graceful prose of his own, Goldfield examines how and why

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

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