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Stepping Stones and Robert E. Lee – Using Memorials to Explore Contested History

Stepping Stones and Robert E. Lee – Using Memorials to Explore Contested History <p>Abstract:</p><p>Memorials and monuments represent a society&apos;s view of its own history and the conclusions we collectively wish to draw about its meaning. In America in recent years, public clashes over the presence of contested public memorials—including and especially monuments dedicated to the Confederate cause in the United States Civil War—have led to considerable debate over the proper role for such monuments in public spaces. Such debates also provide high school teachers with a unique opportunity to explore contested history and the process of memorialization. In this article, that process is analyzed, using the nation of Germany as a comparative example of how to build a "memory culture." Various teaching methods are also discussed, including strategies for reconceptualizing memorials through a "truth and reconciliation" process.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Stepping Stones and Robert E. Lee – Using Memorials to Explore Contested History

The High School Journal , Volume 103 (4) – Feb 11, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Memorials and monuments represent a society&apos;s view of its own history and the conclusions we collectively wish to draw about its meaning. In America in recent years, public clashes over the presence of contested public memorials—including and especially monuments dedicated to the Confederate cause in the United States Civil War—have led to considerable debate over the proper role for such monuments in public spaces. Such debates also provide high school teachers with a unique opportunity to explore contested history and the process of memorialization. In this article, that process is analyzed, using the nation of Germany as a comparative example of how to build a "memory culture." Various teaching methods are also discussed, including strategies for reconceptualizing memorials through a "truth and reconciliation" process.</p>

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 11, 2021

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