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Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War by Catherine Clinton (review)

Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War by Catherine Clinton (review) supplemented these materials for the postemancipation period by con- ducting extensive oral history interviews, beginning in the late 1970s, with members of the community. Nathans was inspired to undertake this project by the popularity of Alex Haley’s Roots: The Saga of an American Family (1976); Herbert G. Gutman’s The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom, 1750–1925 (1976), which also relies heavily on the Cameron pa- pers; and the creation of the Stagville State Historic Site in Durham, North Carolina, which comprises some of the Cameron family’s former holdings (and for which Nathans served as historical adviser). Nathans uses this forced migration of 114 enslaved persons as a win- dow onto the last two centuries of U.S. history, weighing in on many of the issues surrounding slavery, race, and southern and African American history that scholars have debated in recent decades. As the title sug- gests, he examines this community as a counterpoint to the mass migra- tions of African Americans out of the rural South during the twentieth century, focusing instead on those who stayed. Historians have questioned whether land redistribution after the Civil War would have brought sub- stantive change to the South, contending that it might simply http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War by Catherine Clinton (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 8 (2) – May 25, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

supplemented these materials for the postemancipation period by con- ducting extensive oral history interviews, beginning in the late 1970s, with members of the community. Nathans was inspired to undertake this project by the popularity of Alex Haley’s Roots: The Saga of an American Family (1976); Herbert G. Gutman’s The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom, 1750–1925 (1976), which also relies heavily on the Cameron pa- pers; and the creation of the Stagville State Historic Site in Durham, North Carolina, which comprises some of the Cameron family’s former holdings (and for which Nathans served as historical adviser). Nathans uses this forced migration of 114 enslaved persons as a win- dow onto the last two centuries of U.S. history, weighing in on many of the issues surrounding slavery, race, and southern and African American history that scholars have debated in recent decades. As the title sug- gests, he examines this community as a counterpoint to the mass migra- tions of African Americans out of the rural South during the twentieth century, focusing instead on those who stayed. Historians have questioned whether land redistribution after the Civil War would have brought sub- stantive change to the South, contending that it might simply

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 25, 2018

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