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Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War by Andrew F. Smith (review)

Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War by Andrew F. Smith (review) racial demographics of divorced couples). Focusing on attitudes toward these infrequent events—even when looking at postbellum increases in sui- cide, divorce, and personal bankruptcy, the incidents as a percentage of the population are quite small—allows him to make arguments about larger changes in moral and cultural sentiments. However, that focus results, at times, in a sense of uncertainty for the reader about what beyond attitudes had changed over the course of the eighty-fi ve years examined in this study. Still, ultimately, this book represents an important addition to the his- toriography of the nineteenth-century South. Going forward, those who work on the psychological impact of war, the changing role of families, and the role of debt and credit will need to consult Silkenat’s work. Jeff rey W. McClurken jeffrey w. mcclurken, associate professor and chair of history and American studies at the University of Mary Washington, is the author of Take Care of the Living: Reconstructing Confederate Veteran Families in Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 2009). Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War. By Andrew F. Smith. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2011. Pp. 295. Cloth, $27.99.) In Starving the South, Andrew Smith takes readers on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War by Andrew F. Smith (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

racial demographics of divorced couples). Focusing on attitudes toward these infrequent events—even when looking at postbellum increases in sui- cide, divorce, and personal bankruptcy, the incidents as a percentage of the population are quite small—allows him to make arguments about larger changes in moral and cultural sentiments. However, that focus results, at times, in a sense of uncertainty for the reader about what beyond attitudes had changed over the course of the eighty-fi ve years examined in this study. Still, ultimately, this book represents an important addition to the his- toriography of the nineteenth-century South. Going forward, those who work on the psychological impact of war, the changing role of families, and the role of debt and credit will need to consult Silkenat’s work. Jeff rey W. McClurken jeffrey w. mcclurken, associate professor and chair of history and American studies at the University of Mary Washington, is the author of Take Care of the Living: Reconstructing Confederate Veteran Families in Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 2009). Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War. By Andrew F. Smith. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2011. Pp. 295. Cloth, $27.99.) In Starving the South, Andrew Smith takes readers on

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2013

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