Southerners, All?

Southerners, All? SC 11.1-Griffin 1/5/05 11:54 AM Page 6   ...................... by Larry J. Griffin, Ranae J. Evenson, and Ashley B. Thompson For much of its history, the South has been seen as “a white man’s country,” and to be southern meant being white. Sheet music cover (1915), courtesy of the Southern Folklife Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 6 SC 11.1-Griffin 1/5/05 11:54 AM Page 7 or most of its history, the South, in the unforgettable words of southern-born Yale historian U. B. Phillips, was “a white man’s country,” and so “southerners”—the possessors, creators, and rightful heirs of the region—naturally were thought to be white. F Others, very large numbers of others of all colors and many faiths, of course, resided in Dixie and contributed to transforming what might otherwise have been simply the lower right quadrant of the United States into “the South”: African Americans since the early 1600s, Native Americans before that, Chinese and Hispanics by the nineteenth century. They, though, were in the region; they were not of it. To be of it—to be “southern” in a “white man’s” South—one had to be white. Or so it was understood by whites in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/southerners-all-jFYs24yIra
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

SC 11.1-Griffin 1/5/05 11:54 AM Page 6   ...................... by Larry J. Griffin, Ranae J. Evenson, and Ashley B. Thompson For much of its history, the South has been seen as “a white man’s country,” and to be southern meant being white. Sheet music cover (1915), courtesy of the Southern Folklife Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 6 SC 11.1-Griffin 1/5/05 11:54 AM Page 7 or most of its history, the South, in the unforgettable words of southern-born Yale historian U. B. Phillips, was “a white man’s country,” and so “southerners”—the possessors, creators, and rightful heirs of the region—naturally were thought to be white. F Others, very large numbers of others of all colors and many faiths, of course, resided in Dixie and contributed to transforming what might otherwise have been simply the lower right quadrant of the United States into “the South”: African Americans since the early 1600s, Native Americans before that, Chinese and Hispanics by the nineteenth century. They, though, were in the region; they were not of it. To be of it—to be “southern” in a “white man’s” South—one had to be white. Or so it was understood by whites in

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 28, 2005

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month